NEW BOOK CLAIMS GAY SUBCULTURE FLOURISHES AT THE VATICAN

Christopher White
NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT CRUX

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ROME – A new book, whose release is timed to coincide with the start of Pope Francis’s major summit on sex abuse on February 21, contains sweeping, although unverified, claims that 80 percent of the Vatican clergy are gay.
In the Closet of the Vatican: Power, Homosexuality, Hypocrisy by French journalist Frédéric Martel will be released in 8 languages in 20 countries and is the product of 4 years of research and interviews with over 1,500 individuals in 30 countries, including 41 cardinals, 52 bishops, and 45 apostolic nuncios.
Ahead of its release, Crux reviewed portions of the work, which, among its most scandalous claims, alleges Colombian Cardinal Alfonso López Trujillo, Pope John Paul II’s point man on marriage and family, had a “double life” with male prostitutes and affairs, alleges the two deceased “dubia” cardinals were gay, and that “this best kept secret of the Vatican is no secret to Pope Francis,” and it is the motivation for the pontiff regularly speaking out on hypocrisy.
While Martel, who is openly gay, fails to document what percentage of Vatican clergy are actively gay, and at times makes the distinction between those whom he believes are in-touch with their homosexuality but do not act on their orientation and those who do so, he maintains that “the world I am discovering, with its 50 shades of gay, is beyond comprehension,” and ultimately defines many of the power struggles inside the Church.
Martel begins the nearly 600-page book with the expression “he’s of the parish,” a phrase he claims is used frequently inside the Vatican to identify members of the clergy who are known to be homosexual.
As the text unfolds, Martel establishes what he terms as fourteen “rules of the closet,” which are broad principles for understanding both the operations and tensions within the Vatican over this issue.
Perhaps the most salient reason for the timing of the book’s release is the rule that “behind the majority of cases of sexual abuse, there are priests and bishops who have protected the aggressors because of their own homosexuality and out of fear that it might be revealed in the event of a scandal.”
“The culture of secrecy that was needed to maintain silence about the high prevalence of homosexuality in the Church has allowed sexual abuse to be hidden and prelates to act,” he continues.
While Martel steers clear of the argument that homosexuality within the priesthood is a driving force for sexual abuse, he argues that the culture of secrecy is what allows it to flourish, along with its cover-up, even within the highest ranks of power.
Pope Benedict XVI’s abdication from the papacy is 2013, Martel argues, was largely motivated by his inability to navigate and control this environment. While he details the various factors which he terms Benedict’s “via crucis,” including his own declining health, Martel says ten out of the fourteen reasons for the retired pope’s resignation were “linked to the homosexual question.”
Although he doesn’t offer evidential support, besides certain rumors and his affinity for liturgical dress, Martel claims that Benedict “liked to flirt,” and throughout the book implies that the majority of the popes of the last century were at least homosexually inclined.
His most stinging critiques are focused on dominant figures in Pope John Paul II’s more than two decades-long papacy, including his right-hand men, polish prelate Cardinal Stanisław Dziwisz and Cardinal Angelo Sodano, along with Father Marcial Maciel, the disgraced Mexican priest who founded the Legion of Christ and was later found guilty of facilitating a culture of abuse within the movement, in addition to having numerous affairs with both men and women.

Martel’s account of the John Paul era is a blend of both sexual and financial corruption, often entangled.
“The suitcases containing money were a gift only made possible under the pontificate of John Paul II,” he writes, describing Dziwisz and Sodano’s long tradition of bringing in “dirty money for good causes” that were used to promote anti-Communist and pro-marriage and family initiatives.
“Many cardinals around John Paul II in fact led a double life,” he concludes, describing his inner circle as “a ring of lust.”
Trujillo is a major focus of Martel’s exposé, wherein he recounts his four visits to Colombia to interview numerous individuals, including members of the “assembly line of prostitutes” allegedly serviced by the South American cardinal.
“If there is one pathetic character in this book, it is Lopez Trujillo,” Martel writes of the former president of the Pontifical Council for the Family, who reportedly kept an apartment in Medellin near the cathedral for his affairs.
He also recounts interviews with several high-ranking Church officials who either confirmed those accounts or implicity acknowleged them, with Archbishop Claudio Maria Celli, the former head of Vatican communications, telling him, Trujillo was “not a saint by any means.”
In Rome, Martel interviewed numerous male prostitutes that are stationed near Termini, the city’s main train station, who describe priests and members of the hierarchy as being among their most regular, and often most demanding, clients.
During his regularly monthly visits to Rome, where at one point Martel lived inside a Vatican apartment, he also spoke to eleven Swiss Guards, who told Martel they felt as if they were viewed as “fresh meat” by members of the Roman Curia.
“They want to impose celibacy on us and refuse to marry because they want to keep us for themselves,” one told him.
In addition, Martel interviewed members of one of Italy’s main law enforcement branches, the carabinieri, who described numerous cases involving male escorts and Vatican officials relying on their diplomatic immunity for protection.
Many of the recent controversies, both over doctrine and administration, during the Francis pontificate, Martel alleges, are motivated by competing factions of homosexuals within the Church with competing agendas.
He alleges that now deceased Italian Cardinal Carlo Caffarra and German Cardinal Joachim Meisner, two of the four cardinals who famously issued a “dubia” to Pope Francis related to questions over communion for divorced and remarried Catholics, were both homosexually inclined, along with American Cardinal Raymond Burke, another dubia cardinal, with whom Martel spent time in his apartment but whose interview was eventually cancelled due to a scheduling conflict, whom he describes as “unstraight.”
Speaking about the recent letter published by former papal ambassador to the United States, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, which along with alleging that Pope Francis knew of former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick’s history of misconduct, decries the underground “homosexual collusion” of clerics inside the Vatican, Martel says that Viganò fails to acknowledge that many of his perceived allies are, in fact, homosexuals themselves.
“Francis today is the object of a violent campaign, precisely because of his supposed liberalism on questions of sexual morality, by conservative cardinals who are very homophobic – and many of them, secretly homosexual,” writes Martel.
Among his other “rules of the closet” is that the clerics who are perceived to be most “pro-gay” are likely heterosexual and that within the Vatican, heterosexuality is “the exception.”
Martel claims French Cardinal Jean-Louis Pierre Tauran, who died in 2018, served as a close source during his research. The author described Tauran as being “in touch” with his homosexuality. Among his other notable interviews is American Cardinal James Francis Stafford, who the author describes with particular affinity and recounts him as being scandalized by Martel’s findings.
In sum, for Martel, Francis’s own words that “behind rigidity there is always something hidden, in many cases a double life,” serve as a truism for his account.
While the printed book does have an index, at the time of the book’s publication, another 300 pages of additional notes will also be released online.
[Editor’s Note: The claim that 80 percent of the Vatican clergy are gay does not come directly from Martel, but from a priest interviewed in the book.]

PAT SAYS

What a lot of detail on the corruption and sexual scandal within the Vatican ant the RC church.

It seems to be easier to list the ones who are not “at it” than those that are.

I believe they did a secret deal with McCarrick to stop him all he knows about so many others.

But the rot is universal and goes from the bottom to the top and in every diocese in the world.

Its going to keep coming out until everyone walks away from it all.

69 thoughts on “NEW BOOK CLAIMS GAY SUBCULTURE FLOURISHES AT THE VATICAN

  1. Fly on Th WalL 18th Feb 2019 — 8:46 am

    Bottoms up Hi ! The Vatican is miles away. What’s happening here at home. Are they hiding under mushrooms but

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    1. A meaningless comment. You need to go on a Plain English course.

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    2. 8:46
      Top of th mornin! Hi Fly…😇
      I’d say now Fly hi it’s more a case of smokin magic pookies! What’s happin at hom is a good question. Nathin’. They’ve gone to pott. But there’s plenty goin on in the Vatica😜 by all accounts! 😎

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  2. The endless stream of data just verifies what most lay catholics have known for a long time: The Catholic priesthood has metastasized into a homosexual club which defends its position with prolific lies and diversions.

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    1. 9:37 & 10:11
      Time now, for all the ‘good Priests’, to loosen their tongues, find their voices and speak out, even if on this blog.
      Loyalty to Jesus Christ comes first and last.

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      1. Lead the way and give us your name. Easy to make silly demands from behind a screen isn’t it?

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  3. Explains why countless complaints sent to the Vatican have gone “missing” and how McCarrick advanced despite practically everyone knowing about his predilection for boys and seminarians.

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    1. Easy. Appointed to Washington in 2000 when JPII was barely compos mentis – but sufficiently so to sign the document. Traditionallywhen a pope is in his declining years the power brokers are active – when the cat is away….
      Ratzinger saw all that and ensured it wouldn’t be repeated in his time.

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  4. Not Eamon Martin 18th Feb 2019 — 10:51 am

    None of this should be a surprise to anybody with involvement with the church. The church’s relationship to sexual matters is dysfunction at almost every level.

    Once a person is well formed they should live according to their conscience, not the ideological aspirations of a dysfunctional foreign country

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    1. MournemanMichael 18th Feb 2019 — 1:00 pm

      NEM: In relation to the forthcoming event in that dysfunctional foreign country, Peter Standford, former editor of the Catholic Herald writes of the meeting in Rome to discuss clerical abuse:
      “….we can only expect more make do and mend, fine words, dramatic gestures, and then crossing of fingers and hoping it all goes away. It won’t. And faithful, but despairing Catholics will quietly continue to depart the pews.”
      And he should know. Says it all really.
      MMM

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    2. You’re a Protestant.

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      1. Who are you referring to 1.30Anon? And what do you mean: trying to be derogatory by calling some undesignated person a follower of another Christian religion? Such ecumenical charity!
        Mind you you’re not restricted to comment of less than 20 letters: just try harder.

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    3. @ 10.51
      Like the Well Formed James Martin, I suppose!
      Who decides when you are Well Formed? Who decides when such a Well Formed person is to be allowed indoctrinate children and others?
      Tommyrot.

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      1. Not Eamon Martin 18th Feb 2019 — 9:37 pm

        MMM – thank you.
        Anon 1.30 – while factually inaccurate thank you for the lovely compliment. Someone has to protest and the Protestant’s I know are all outstanding folk.
        @ Anon 1.52. Great question. The seminary council decide who is well formed. I hope this knowledge instills confidence.

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      2. It’s appalling that the sincere and conservative Fr Martin is made a target for sh-t throwers.

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  5. After the disgrace and downfall of KOB, newspaper articles quoted sources close to the Church in Scotland saying: “that everyone knew he was a Mo.” Did you know he was a Mo, Bp Pat?

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      1. Ah hae ma doots.

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      2. What is a Mo?

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      3. What’s a Mo? Apart from an out of breath cow?

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    1. I expect Elsie knew.

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    2. What is a ‘Mo’?😕

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      1. I thought you were ‘one of them.’

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    3. A mo?

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      1. Yes, a mo. Eg MC.

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  6. Read McCarrick’s pathetic statements trying to sanitize the actions of clerical predators before he was defrocked. Much like the collared boyos being sent out to but here…
    https://www.crisismagazine.com/2019/haunted-by-mccarrick

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  7. “I think [people] may feel that one act, even if it happened 30 years ago, should disqualify a man for continuing in the ministry. I’m not there yet,” McCarrick continually repeated. “You can have situations, say 30 years ago, where memories are not as accurate perhaps, or where people might have misinterpreted something,” he said, in an interview still posted on the USCCB’s website on child and youth protection – Former Cardinal now Mr Theodore McCarrick.
    https://www.crisismagazine.com/2019/haunted-by-mccarrick

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  8. Serious Question here: say all the scandal and serious problems cause a remarkable transformation, a “Vatican 3” type situation.
    What elements would be on the table realistically?
    *Married Priests?
    *Gay Married Priests?
    *Woman Priests?
    * Wider use of Deacons?
    *Decentralisation of Power in the Church?
    Anyone else any ideas? I wonder what changes could be introduced that wouldn’t result in a split in the Church?

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    1. Not going to happen Rusty.

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    2. You cannot table a motion for married priests without tabling a motion for divorced priests. Whether liked or not if there are married priests there will, sooner or later, be a divorced priest.

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  9. There are two issues that I think, given the present timing, could be liable to be conflated together. Both are true, but should be carefully separated.
    1. The Vatican, the priesthood, the clerical culture is imbued with a gay culture. There is no doubt about this. Many of us will have experienced this ourselves in the priests we have come in to contact with in our parishes. There are questions to ask about behaviour, about hypocrisy, about the reason why so many gay men enter the priesthood, about the damage that the clerical culture of secrecy and hypocrisy can do to an individual. + Pat is right in highlighting the inherent dishonesty, duplicity and hypocrisy in a clerical culture that for whatever reason sees priests living double and secret lives. If the Church continues to insist on celibacy as a requirement for priesthood, then that requirement should be lived out by its priests. I, for one, think the Church has got it wrong about mandatory celibacy, and my hope is that in the future it will revisit this requirement. But, for the moment, the Church does insist on it, and as such it’s priests should be expected to live it. If they do not, then there is a mismatch between their public presentation and their private lives, and that is not good for them, for us, and for the Church. It is dishonest, and unhealthy.
    2. The second issue has to do with the business of sexual abuse of vulnerable and young people. There is an upcoming synod in Rome to discuss this, and Pope Francis evidently wants to show through this synod and associated robust action in recent days (McCarrick) that he ‘gets it’ and wants the Church to deal with this matter. He will meet resistance from the Church in the south, where there is still denial, but those in the Church of the north well understand the existential seriousness of this matter. What astounds me is that it has taken decades for the Papacy and the Church to get to a point where they seem to be ‘getting it’. Where have they been for the last 20 years as this tsunami of abuse has submerged the Church ? This synod and a new seriousness to address this issue should have happened decades ago. Not just in a zero tolerance policy (which does have its problems in terms of fairness and due process for the accused) but also in a serious evaluation of the culture of the Church that has allowed this to happen, and for that read ‘clerical hierarchy and culture’.
    3. There have been attempts to link 1 and 2 – the so called orthodox right wing trying to pin the blame on homosexuals for this abuse etc. Although, many of us will know that whilst there may be a good proportion of abuse that is committed by homosexual clergy on pubescent boys and young men, there is also a good number of priests who abuse young girls and women. Indeed, in my experience the one priest I know who was an abuser was an abuser of young girls. To try to transfer the fault for abuse on to homosexual clergy is clearly wrong and an attempt to bypass asking the really difficult questions about why this abuse happens. Ditto trying to blame it on ‘The Devil’. To attempt to link 1 and 2 as cause and effect fails to understand the systemic issues of clerical culture, hierarchy, abuse of power, privilege, entitlement and authority which is truly at the root of abuse.
    4. Only if the Church and the synod understand this will they begin to find truly effective ways of dealing with this matter and coming to some resolution. And that will involve very difficult and personally painful structural changes and cultural changes to clergy, priest and bishops, to the Church, and to the Pope himself.

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    1. 12:49
      Why do so many gay men enter the priesthood?
      Did you ask a similar question about straight men when the priesthood was, apparently, predominantly heterosexual?

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      1. 6:09
        The problem is not gay men in the Priesthood.
        The problem is moral evil, hypocrisy, predatory gay men acting out and the resultant corruption.

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    2. Nothing will satisfy you except a ripping up of the Bible, as Luther edited it in his day, so as to remove any censor by God of homosexuality.
      You just have to have it.
      Bella Dodd exposed how communists were infiltrated into the american educational and labour organisations in the thirties and forties, and how homosexuals were selected as the best way of undermining and destroying the Catholic Church from within. And so we arrive at today and yourself.

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      1. 6:56
        Whose post are you referring to?

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      2. 6:56

        Your criticism of Martin Luther is historically untrue. On the contrary, Luther excoriated homosexual practice.

        As for my wanting to rip up the Bible, such hyperbole is strawman argument, and I’m not going to be waylaid beyond saying that Jesus himself ‘ripped up’ significant parts of the Torah, the legal and moral foundation of the Hebrew Bible, when he outlawed what it sanctioned: execution for various mitzvot breaches, including adultery.

        And what to make of Bella Dodd? She caused quite a political stir in 1950s America, with her outlandish ‘reds under the bed’ scaremongering. She made a name for herself during this hysterical, anti-communist period in American post-war politics, now ignominiously titled ‘The McCarthy Era’. Of course, it all raises a good laugh these days as it made fools of such public figures as Senator Joseph McCarthy, and former communists, like Dodds.

        Dodds is no more reliable in her claims of conspiratorial infiltration of the Church by homosexuals than she was that about communists and American politics of the 1950s.

        My advice to you is, in future, avoid conservative Catholic websites that promote unchecked this kind of histrionic nonsense.😆

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    3. 6:48

      I agree with you in as much as you’ve stated. But there is, too, the problem of clericalism in the Church as a facilitating/aggravating factor, and the fact that Roman Catholic ordinands are required to ignore personal conscience on the day they become priests by forswearing it in favour of episcopal deference.

      Add to this moral murk the fact that priests are financially dependent on their bishops/religious superiors and you begin to understand why rocking the clerical barque is not only morally prohibited (through that episcopal vow of obedience), but financially inhibiting, since an outspoken priest (Who’s an example? Bishop Pat.) could lose the things most others take for granted: an income, a home, etc.

      Some posters here have, from time to time, sneered at the Oratory Society for its relatvely low numbers, both members, and those attending Mass. But what they’ve missed is the fact that this society is precisely modelled on the early church in terms of priestly and religious, financial self-reliance. In other words, these guys actually work for a living instead of insisting canonically that lay people support them. Most (the vast majority, in fact) of Roman Catholic priests are not needed for full-time ministry and should, therefore, be in full-time employment. This would free them from the constraints, moral and otherwise, of being dependent on outrageous spendthrifts, like Noel Treanor.

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      1. 7:21
        I agree, clericalist culture has hugely contributed to and aggravated matters. It’s a core component of this morally corruptive morass. What is the wording of the promise ordinands make? The days are rapidly approaching where clerics will probably need to work part-time.(No harm).
        Numbers in congregations are dropping and more are likely to abandon Church attendance following the publication of Martels book.

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      2. 7.21: Pat is no re model for any priest. He did what he had to do, his refer to g the Cathic Church being his own choice. Magna, you are selective in choosing a narrative that suits your agenda. Pat depends entirely, as do all priests, on the financial support of parishioners. Pat also charges stipends for his services, far higher than any priest receives for his work. Pat also travels the length and breadth of the country providing services for all and sundry. He is on a far greater salary than most priests. Pat may have ideals but none greater than the very many good priests I know who get on with their daily work. The early Christian church model is present in many parishes where people, priests and religious seek to live the ideals of Jesus and his gospel. Not an easy task but there are many exemplary parish communities who keep the early church vision alive. I certainly did not forfeit my conscience or integrity on the day of ordination. While you have difficulty in believeng other narratives other than your own or that of Pat, there are other stories that deserve credit. (But then, I wouldn’t be humble any more!). You can’t win.

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      3. Bella Dodds. Is she anything to Nigel and Diana? Or Stephen Dodds that was in the wing, Magna? 😉

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      4. @ 8.25
        Reply was to 6.49
        The reference to Luther was in relation to people who slice out books / parts of the Bible they don’t like.
        Your dismissal of the infiltration of American institutions ( and those of other countries too ) as a deliberate policy by Stalin says more about your own prejudices and naïveté. Was Stalin too stupid to think of or implement this form of attack?
        Archbishop Fulton Sheen, I’ll take his opinion over yours any day.
        As regards Jesus ripping things up you know perfectly well what He said about not changing a jot.
        Anyone like yourself who doesn’t recognise the influence of the Communist anti-family agenda on the Western world today and how it has weakened it is in denial.

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    4. 8:33
      I did not state that Bishop Pat was a role-model for ‘any priest’. What I did was suggest that the practice employed at the Oratory (of those not in full-time ministry’s being in full-time, paid employment, to support themselves financially) was historically the practice in the early church and implicitly, therefore, a model for the many priests today (the vast majority) who clearly are not in full-time ministry themselves.
      Bishop Pat, as far as I know, IS in full-time ministry and is, therefore, entitled to be supported financially by those who seek his help.

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      1. 9.11: Magna, you are dancing on the proverbial head of a needle. What is Pat’s full time ministry? How is it different to the work I do as a priest? I depend, like Pat, on the generosity of others for my salary. You are confused by your information and interpretation of how priests in general are salaried. You somehow enjoy muddying the waters….Anyway, since you are not a supporter of priests, why are you concerned?

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    5. 12:41
      People who ‘slice out books/parts of the Bible they don’t like’? What the hell do you think forming the Canon of Sacred Scripture by the early church entailed? Various books, and portions of books, accepted, and then rejected. Apocryphal works quoted by many Church Fathers as authorative scripture, but not by others, even though the Hebrew Canon of Scripture excluded them. And then along comes Jerome, commissioned by Pope Damasus, who decides, quite arbitrarily, that the early church should follow the Hebrew Canon after all.
      Come off it, man! It wasn’t just Luther who ‘mucked about’ with scripture. They ALL were at it!
      As for communist spies in America, I never dismissed this. Of course there were spies in the States! There were even Nazi spies, too, during the Second World War, of whom some were caught and executed. What I did dismiss were outlandish, hysterical depictions of communist presence in America, the kind that titillated hyperbolic minds, like those of Dodds and McCarthy.
      And on to Jesus. He was referring to the Decalogue, not to Mosaic Law (which comprises the first five books of the Old Testament). Jesus, clearly, from that gospel scene with the adulterous woman, rejected the Mosaic prescription that she should be stoned to death for adultery. What should be just as clear, then, is that he was not referring to Mosaic Law when he said that he had come to fulfill the Law (The Ten Commandments).

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    6. 10:29
      I’m concerned because it is a matter of justice. The vast majority of Roman Catholic priests are not required for full-time ministry, as you well know, and should, therefore, support themselves financially through paid employment rather than pose as gentlemen of leisure (self-pampered, financial parasites).
      Bishop Pat IS in full-time ministry and is thus entitled to be supported by those who seek his services.

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  10. ‘In sum, for Martel, Francis’s own words that “behind rigidity there is always something hidden, in many cases a double life,” serve as a truism for his account.’
    Would Benedict’s ‘intrinsically disordered’ remark be a case in point?
    Is he thinking of KOB and John Nienstedt?
    Fr Terence Crotty O.P. used the expression ’intrinsically disordered,’ in a sermon in a Dublin church.
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.thejournal.ie/catholic-church-sermon-gay-people-2245126-Jul2015/%3famp=1

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  11. What is the point of this meeting in Rome this week? As a lay Catholic who has done my best to keep the faith, I was hopeful when I heard about McCarrick getting the boot. Then, I went into the novena in Galway Cathedral this morning and saw the man mentioned here several times, the former CSSR, hearing confessions, even though he’s supposed to be under investigation, even though he and his housekeeper spread manure about the priest who reported him and about countless others, and even though the CSSRs who are running the novena were supposed to be delighted to see the back of him and warned Martin Drennan about him. I just don’t know anymore. I really don’t. Okay, he could be innocent of the safeguarding issue, but his track record leaves huge questions over him. The fact he’s been parading around the cathedral the last few months while he’s supposed to be under investigation is alarming.

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  12. The new book by Martel will undoubtey lift the lid on the reality of a celibate priesthood and the Church with its inner turmoils, nuances, expressions, sexual abuse, corrupt leadership, hypocrisy and deceptions. If we can believe all that Martel has written and accept some of his conclusions, then we can begin to seriously debate these issues. It is important to make the distinction that not all homosexual are paedophiles. That’s wrong and unjust. However because of the secrecy around homosexuality within priesthood and the shame and stigma attached to any sexual perversion, I can understand how such secrecy enabled perpetrators continue their destructive behaviour. I know gay priests who live very chaste and faithful lives: I know others who are in relationships and who, to me, are very well adjusted human beings and who bring something worthwhile to their ministry. I don’t necessarily approve of this but these arrangements are completely different to anything apporoximating to child abuse. We should not equate homosexuality with paedophilia.

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  13. I can think of only two ex-Maynooth dons now in ministry outside Ireland and still subject to oversight by Irish bishops. Rt Rev Monsignor Hugh Connolly and Rev Paul Prior SJ.

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    1. And the latter skipping along happily in the SJ noviciate in Birmingham like a little new born lamb. Mutton dressed as lamb it should be.

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  14. The new book claims that Mgr Ricca (of whom ostentatious humble said “who am I to judge”) facilitated surplice-lifters in the Casa just down the corridor from Frank.

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  15. Martels book may prove to be a game changer.

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    1. Bp Pat’s blog has been a game changer in Ireland. A a truly shocking theory about the Maynooth; the largest gay community in Ireland.

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      1. Poster @ 6:14 what are
        you going on about?
        It’s not clear.

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  16. It is a pity that Martel cannot verify his claims about the incidence of practising homosexuals in the Vatican. Impressions or allegations of this, and of people’s sexual orientation there, are not necessarily factual and should not, therefore, be relied upon for future policy or change. This could be unjust.

    It is important, too, that these ‘findings’ focus readers’ attention on what is really, and morally, at issue here: sexual hypocrisy, NOT homosexuality itself. Sadly, this ‘research’ by Martel could be used by men like Vigano to push a nasty, homophobic agenda, and Pope Francis appears too ineffectual to stop them.

    This book is going to cause a global sensation, and people can do the strangest things when they are all fired up, not by established facts, but by sensational claims.

    My sympathy lies with those gay priests who are living chaste lives while doing their best to serve Jesus (of course, within the moral constraints of a priestly vow of obedience to the kind of men who may have abused kids themselves, or who may have concealed such abuse to protect the institutional Church.😕).

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    1. Thank you for your comment.

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      1. You’re welcome. ☺

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    2. “My sympathy lies with those gay priests who are living chaste lives… ”
      Which one?

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    3. global sensation? nah, it’s too deja vu

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  17. 4.07: Magna, while you invite much deserved critical assessment and judgment, this contribution is very balanced, just and kind. There is no doubt that many will only read the sensationalist headlines and take them as definitive judgment. These misleading headlines will encourage homophobic hatred. There will be many who will depend on sound byte analysis and paint all gay people with the same brush. This blog hopefully will debate only on fact based, clinical evidence and not on a fired up lynch mob who hate the very words ‘Church’ and ‘Priest’. I’m uncertain if Martel is completely truthful.

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  18. Seriously, anyone who’s been in seminary or religious life won’t be surprised by this… except the volitionally blind.
    Personally I’d rather find out something I don’t already know!

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  19. Saw a video on click&chic.it from jan 2017.
    The cleric was jumping around apparently in song…like a hyena.
    Pierre Xhayet.
    Heading said something like too much wine. Lol

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  20. I don’t give a monkeys whether a priest is gay or not. What pisses me off is the hypocrisy. Do as I say and not as I do brigade

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    1. It’s not so much the hypocrisy that bothers me. There are some, who know they are prone to some sin and so know better than most what the sin is and how it can be avoided. So it is understandable that they might call out a particular sin. What’s much more dangerous for the church is when clergymen are given authority to act out of their prejudices and be utterly blind. I saw a gay priest given charge of a parish. Soon, the only visiting priests were gay, the only people he hung around with were gay, the new part time worker was good looking and gay in fact the only people he surrounded himself with were gay. And the straight people were literally driven out – a woman into a mental home, a long term diocesan employee into homelessness etc – and all supported by a gay bishop. This brand of church is not of God, cannot be supported and will fall.

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    2. I’ve had cock since before my Diaconate and after Priesthood until today. I’m not ashamed of it one bit and I think all these moral crusaders on here need to take their heads out of their arses. Get a life and get over yourselves, most are in the closet themselves or gagging to get the next bit of sexual tittle tattle – they probably get off on it. It’s a fact of life, us queers in the priesthood is not some sudden strange phenomena and it won’t be going away anytime soon. Rent boys, cruising for Sex, gay sex apps, saunas, hotel meets, bars are all good. The many married younger/older guys who shag and then tell you they’re going home to wee wifey is a bonus turn on.

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      1. Your salary is coming to an end……keep shagging….no one cares

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    3. … the dirty mac brigade.

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  21. Have a look at this:
    https://www.thetablet.co.uk/news/11382/pope-surrounded-by-sycophants-and-church-run-according-to-jesuit-order-s-rules-says-m-ller-
    Cardinal Mueller having a poke at the way the Church is run by a clique. He won’t have a go at the Pope himself, but in time honoured fashion he blames his advisors, so really he’s blaming the Pope.
    And a couple of things stand out from the reactionary, neanderthal, Teutonic cardinal:
    1. Child sexual abuse in the Church is being ‘instrumentalist’ by people – I guess he means ‘weaponised’, in order to get at the Church. We, the Church, are victims !
    2. In respect of sexual abuse by priests, ‘There was absolutely no proof that it had anything to with clericalism. “The root cause lies in the depraved character of the perpetrator and has nothing to do with his office”.’ So says Mueller.
    3. He was still convinced that there was a connection between sexual abuse and homosexuality.
    So we see the same old transference behaviour: It’s nothing special to the Church, or its the fault of its clericalism, it happens everywhere else, so there !; it’s all to do with the wickedness of the perpetrator, meaning The Devil, so there ! ; and it’s really all the fault of the gays, so there again !. Game, set, and match ! Or so he thinks.
    Sounds a bit familiar, doesn’t it ? Think back 70 odd years to his home country and the way in which they transferred the blame for everything on to others. You can take the reactionary out of Germany, but you can’t take the reactionary out of the German, at least in the case of Mueller.
    No wonder the Pope moved him on ! Such a reactionary, out of touch, completely blinkered idiot. Has he learned nothing ?!

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