MR AND MRS SAINT PATRICK

SAINT PATRICK WAS MARRIED – HIS WIFE WAS SHEELAH AND HER DAY WAS CELEBRATED ON MARCH 18TH

From http://www.mythicaliteland blog

While the whole population of Ireland and people of Irish descent around the world celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day this coming Saturday, not many people will know that the day after, March 18th, is dedicated to Patrick’s wife, Sheelah. Yes, Saint Patrick was married, according to tradition!

The revelation that Saint Patrick had a wife whose name was Sheelah is tremendously exciting for a number of reasons. Shane Lehane, a folklorist from University College Cork (UCC) has discovered pre-Famine references to a widespread belief that Saint Patrick had a wife and that St. Sheelah’s Day was celebrated the day after St. Patrick’s Day, on March 18th.

Lehane is quoted in the Irish Times as saying “Pre-Famine, if you go back to the newspapers in Ireland they talk not just about Patrick’s Day but also Sheelah’s Day. I came across numerous references that Sheelah was thought to be Patrick’s wife. The fact that we have Patrick and Sheelah should be no surprise. Because that duality, that union of male and female together, is one of the strongest images that we have in our mythology.”

Great Famine

Although the devastating effects of the Great Famine on Irish culture might never be fully quantified, we have a significant example here of a folk belief that seems to have died out in Ireland with the famine. References to Sheelah’s Day were found in the Freeman’s Journal of 1785, 1811 and 1841, but the feast day has been “largely forgotten about in Ireland” according to Lehane.
Some time ago, I wrote about the story of the “twining branches” (from the tale of Deirdre and the Children of Uisneach) and how memories of this creation myth were brought by Irish emigrants to Nova Scotia. The story of Sheelah seems to follow a similar fate. Before the Famine, which happened in the late 1840s, the celebration of St. Patrick’s Day continued into March 18th for his wife’s special day, St. Sheelah’s Day (and of course in typical Irish fashion copious amounts of alcohol were consumed.)
However, after the Famine the tradition seems to have died out here, but Irish migrants who ended up in such places as Newfoundland, Canada and Australia brought the tradition with them.
Lehane says perhaps the most enduring legacy of Sheelah is the so-called “Sheelah’s Brush.” This is the name given by Newfoundlanders and Atlantic Canadians to a winter snowstorm that falls after St Patrick’s Day.
Sometimes referred to as “Sheelah’s Broom” – or if the snowstorm is mild with only a bare covering of snow, “Sheila’s Blush” – it is still referred to respectfully by meteorologists and fisherman in that part of the world.
Undoubtedly some media commentators will pick up on the obvious relevance of Patrick’s wife to the whole discourse about Catholic celibacy – and the perceived connection between that peculiar diktat of the traditional church here and the many sex and paedophile scandals that have decimated the Catholic faith here in Ireland.

The Hill of Slane is strongly associated with St. Patrick, but there is no mention here of St. Sheelah, his wife.
A somewhat obscure and tenuous but perhaps very important connection is made by Lehane between Saint Sheelah and the “hugely interesting archaeological manifestation that also bears her name” – the Sheelah-na-Gig.

“Sheela-na-Gig is a basic medieval carving of a woman exposing her genitalia. These images are often considered to be quite grotesque. They are quite shocking when you see them first. Now we look at them very much as examples of old women showing young women how to give birth. They are vernacular folk deities associated with pregnancy and birth.”

And Lehane believes that the tradition of Sheelah could and should be revived and embraced in Ireland.

“Sheelah represented, for women in particular, a go-to person because she represented the female. The Sheela-na-Gig is a really important part of medieval folk tradition. She is an important folk deity. The figure of Sheelah was perhaps much bigger than suggested by the scant mentions we find in the old newspaper accounts. She would have been massively important. She represents a folk personification, allied to, what can be termed, the female cosmic agency, and being such, would have played a major role in people’s everyday lives. It is a pity that the day has died out. But maybe we will revive it.”

A revival and reactivation of Sheelah

My own view is that the revival of the tradition of a female deity equal in status to Patrick might very well be important to the spiritual well-being of a country which has been very heavily influenced by patriarchal religious zeal for centuries, an influence that is seen by some as a contributory factor in many of Ireland’s ills. The symbolic importance of Patrick (who was, ironically, a Romano-British immigrant to these shores) cannot be understated in the milieu of a nation defined for so long by its trenchant support for the male-dominated Roman church.
Now we have the chance to reconcile the tradition of an almost-forgotten woman into the complex folk fabric of a fractured cultural history – a history that, it must be borne in mind, was vibrantly aware of the necessity for accessibility to the feminine deity in most of its past eras. The patriarchal influence of Rome did not decimate the ancient divine feminine – rather it forced upon us some sort of collective obeisance to the supremacy of the omniscient and jealous male god of the old testament, forcing the old indigenous female deities such as the Cailleach and Sheelah into the shadows.
There was “suspicion and even hostility to the feminine which many leading Christian thinkers and writers expressed in the early medieval period”, according to Gearóid Ó Crualaoich in The Book of the Cailleach.
The female wasn’t altogether banished, but rather was revealed in a guise that was somewhat familiar, with reflections of the ancient goddesses of old but very much dressed in the raiment of a woman whose power was contingent upon the emanations of the Catholic patriarchy. Thus, Brigid the prehistoric goddess survived as the saint who became known to us as Muire na nGael, the Mary of the Irish, and indeed the Catholic Church had allowed Mary to become a co-redemptrix with Jesus. The presence of this ancient goddess, albeit in diluted form, in the church of Rome was probably one of the factors that had helped the church to become established in the first place.

National celebrations

Further to the potential revival of the tradition of Sheelah here is the possibility that incorporating her into our national celebrations could become a hugely significant act. We have here the very vivid and exciting possibility of activating or reactivating a feminine energy that is, as CG Jung might have suggested, of supreme importance for the ultimate rehabilitation of the modern human soul through the reconciliation of the masculine and feminine elements in life.
Can one yet countenance the notion of a Saint Patrick’s Day AND a Saint Sheelah’s Day? A national holiday for Ireland, spanning two days, recognising the male and the female, and allowing both to hold equal court in the hearts and minds of Irish people and their descendants and friends all around the world?
One of the ironies of the story about the disappearance of Sheelah from popular folk memory is that she hasn’t vanished at all. The Sheelah tradition simply moved abroad with the forced migrations resulting from mass starvation. Many of those who stayed behind perished. Sheelah’s story might have perished with the Famine also (even if Patrick’s story only became more ubiquitous) except for the fact that her flame was kept burning abroad, in distant lands, by those who left these shores. The supreme irony is that Patrick – who was married – brought the tradition of Jesus to these shores, from a distant land, and that even though that tradition eventually transmogrified so that it espoused celibacy for its all-male clergy, Patrick himself had a wife.
It could only happen in Ireland.

PAT SAYS

I find this story of Sheelagh important and inspiring.

The sanitized story of St. Patrick the RC church is not an accurate picture of the 5th century Patrick.

Patrick, in my opinion, is not a total myth. I believe there was a person, or collection of persons, leading to the development of today’s St. Patrick.

He was certainly not the kind of RC archbishop of Armagh Amy Martin is.

A 4th century man bears little resemblance to a 21st man.

Religion and Christianity in the 4th century would bear no resemblance to its 21st century form.

It’s good to remember St. Patrick but it would be good to remember his wife St. Sheelagh as well.

I will offer Mass today in honour of Paddy’s wife, Sheelagh.

115 thoughts on “MR AND MRS SAINT PATRICK

  1. What a load of horseshit.

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    1. No, it’s not that stuff, since clerical celibacy wasn’t canonically obligatory until the 11th or 12th century. Patrick could, therefore, have married, and no one in Ireland (or anywhere else, for that matter) would have thought any less of him for it. In fact, his assumed celibacy would have looked distinctly odd in a land that did, tribally, honour women to a degree not experienced today in Roman Catholicism.
      Unfortunately, we all have been too heavily influenced by a religious patriarchal view of women, which has established them, and sexual appetite, as twin evils for men, and women as the the cause of men’s moral downfall (Genesis). But this Romano-Judeo view of women would have been absurd to the ancient tribal Irish.
      Celtic (or ancient Irish) mythology honoured women, like the seasons, for their ability to be fertile: to bring forth progeny. This was human and non-human, that is, food from the harvest to sustain humanity. All three elements (the male, the female, and the seasons collectively) represented a collaboration that was fundamental in this mythology, and was at the heart of Celtic understanding of the world. It is, I believe, one reason Patrick, according to tradition, chose shamrock to illustrate the concept of divine trinity, at the heart of Roman Catholic teaching. The ancient Irish were particularly reverent towards nature, and her bounty, and it would, in the circumstance, have been logical for Patrick to have chosen something from nature, shamrock, to help explain such a difficult concept intellectually as the Trinity. Some (Fr G. Rutler for one) doubt that Patrick ever used shamrock in this way because it would have represented more an early Church heresy, Partialism, than orthodox Roman Catholic teaching on the Trinity. However, there is no evidence that I’m aware of for Rutler’s opinion.

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      1. Mutton at 8:48 dressed up as lamb. Drivel dressed up as erudition. Wikipedia in the hands of someone without the ability to evaluate what (s)he finds.
        George Otto Simms, one of the authoritative voices on St Patrick showed that the link between Patrick and the shamrock goes back no further than the 17th Century.

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      2. MC jumps to Pat’s defence. Anybody surprised?

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    2. 9:16

      As you acknowledge in your post, Simms was only ‘one’ authorative voice on Patrick (one of many, I might add) and certainly not an infallible one.

      While explicit association of shamrock and Patrick (the wearing of the stuff on his feastday) perhaps dates from the 17th century, the tradition on which it is based is older. Let’s be intelligent about this: the Irish didn’t decide one day in that century suddenly to start wearing shamrock in honour of Patrick: the act had to have some sort of provenance. Even Simms would have acknowledged this much.

      Simms opinion (and I stress ‘opinion’) is not definitive: the tradition that Patrick used shamrock as a teaching aid for the ancient Irish is entirely plausible, not only for the reasons stated in my earlier post, but because Irish mythology expressed at least two triple deities, and shamrock was sacred to its druidic priests.

      The tradition is moot, and will probably remain so…until Patrick himself can settle the matter one way or the other.😆

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      1. George Otto Simms is a Protestant so whatever St Patrick did or did not do is none of his business.

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      2. Supply one reference connecting Patrick and shamrock which predates the 17th Century. Your undergraduate bluff cuts no ice @ 10:00 a.m.

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      3. Dear 10:22,
        Simms was Patrick’s successor in the Anglican line and was as fine an Irishman and scholar as you’ll get, you ignorant and unlettered boor.

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    3. 10:22

      Good grief!

      What an awful, sectarianly bigoted thought.😕

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      1. Such lovely Irish names “George Otto Simms”. Was he of Planter stock?

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      2. 11:28
        Maybe you’d prefer more ‘Irish’-sounding names like McLoughlin (son of the [foreign] Vikings) or Walsh (Welsh). 😀
        How far back in history do you need to go before you draw a line in the sand and say that only names which were here before this time are genuinely Irish and all afterwards are planters? 😀 Arguably the Celts were planters since they supplanted the Tuatha Dé Danann.

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    4. 10:20
      I don’t jump to anyone’s defence because of who they are.
      Did you read my posts on ‘Bloody Sunday’ a few blogs back? I certainly didn’t agree with Pat’s view on the events that day, nor did he agree with mine.
      Don’t be childish.😆

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      1. 1:16 the test is whether they are Catholic or not and as such are entitled to opine on St Patrick. Walshes and McLaughlin’s are likely to be Catholic but Simms etc are New English and therefore Proddy and as guilty of wiping out a culture as were the English who went to Australia, NZ, America. So spare me the faux outrage on behalf of the Irish Ascendancy.

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    5. 10:46

      Oral tradition leaves no forensic trail. But logic dictates that the custom of wearing shamrock on St Patrick’s Day must have some historical raison d’étre: some basis in fact that makes historical point of the exercise.

      As I said, the EXPLICIT association of shamrock with Patrick (actually wearing the plant on his feastday) may have begun in the 17th century, but the tradition on which it must, logically, have been based has to be centuries older.

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      1. Your ignorance is breath-taking at 11:06 and shows no awareness of the plethora of early-medieval (500-800 AD) and high-medieval 800-1300 AD) literature on Patrick in both Irish and Hiberno-Latin. Ludwig Bieler, Professor of Palaeography at UCD was one of the world experts on Patrick and is recognised as an authoritative sources on medieval manuscripts on Patrick.

        ‘Logic dictates…’ ‘No written trail…
        You’d be laughed out of an undergraduate seminar if that was the extent of your argument.

        Wikipedia is only as good as the evaluation of those who use it.

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      2. Don’t react to the Troll

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    6. 1:32

      Are you the poster at 10:46?

      Answer my question, and I’ll address your post , in full, at 1:32.😆

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    7. 1:32, even though you haven’t answered my post at 2:48, I’ll try to address your remarks.

      The poster at 10:46 was asking for evidence that the shamock and Patrick were connected before the 17th century. He or she didn’t ask whether there was evidence for anything else about Patrick before this time, so my reply was to his specific query. There is, to my knowledge, no documentary or artefactual evidence whatever that connects the two before this period.

      I know that there is documentary evidence about Patrick concerning other aspects of his life, but then, I didn’t deny this. Had you troubled to read, more carefully, my posts at 10:00 and 11:06, you would have discovered this for yourself and wouldn’t now have to suffer the embarrassment of my having to spell it out for you here.

      Wikipedia may only be ‘as good as the evaluation of those who use it’, but before a person can evaluate, he must learn to read diligently, in order to ensure that what is being evaluated actually exists on the page, and not just in his head.😆

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      1. Your earlier post was an ‘exposé’ in more than one sense. You exposed anachronistic fallacy in “….it is one reason I believe why Patrick chose shamrock to illustrate the concept if divine trinity…”
        As Bieler and Simms show, there isn’t a shred of evidence for such a claim.
        Your nonsense about lack of literary sources is risible breathtaking ignorance.

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    8. 7:59
      How on Earth is my statement anachronistic?! (By the way, you misquoted me: I should never use ‘reason’ and ‘why’ in the same sentence, as this would be tautalogous. Reread the relevant part of my post at 8:48, to discover what I actually stated, and not what you imagined I stated.)
      Frankly, your posts are becoming bizarre, and desperate to vindicate your original, silly point, brought on by careless reading of my comments this morning.
      I don’t disagree with your sources; in fact, in my post at 4:44, I expressly agreed with them: ‘There is, to my knowledge, no documentary or aretefactual evidence whatever that connects the two (shamrock and Patrick) before this period.’ Had you read these posts, carefully, you’d have known this for yourself and would not now, again, have to suffer the embarrassment of my having to spell it out for you here.
      So not only are your posts becoming bizarre and desperate, but they are also repetitious. I know an ego when I experience one, especially such a stubborn ego as yours.
      Let me spell out for you something else: it is COMMON BLOODY SENSE (forget fancy words, like ‘logic’) to reason that such a custom as wearing a sprig of shamrock on Patrick’s feastday would have caught on WITHOUT there being SOME traditional historical truth to the belief that the saint did, after all, use the humble shamrock as a teaching aid for the ancient Irish, SINCE THEY ALREADY BELIEVED IN PAGAN DIVINE TRIADS, which is why Irish druids held shamrock to be sacred; it physically symbolised their abstract, theocratic beliefs.
      What a wise man Patrick was, to have adopted this humble, tactile symbol, already revered by the ancient Irish, to elucidate Roman Catholic theological teaching on the Trinity! The ancient Irish were accustomed to this symbol and would not have baulked at its use by Patrick, since THEY ALREADY BELIEVED IN TRIUNE DEITIES, albeit pagan.
      Patrick was as wise here, you utter fool, as he was when he christianised the ancient Irish custom of gathering at watery sites to worship aquatic pagan gods.
      You know SFA!
      Jeez! You bloody moron!😠

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      1. Arguing about shamrocks? LOL

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  2. All very interesting until you get to this line:
    “My own view is that the revival of the tradition of a female deity equal in status to Patrick….’
    Saint Patrick? A deity? The blogger is out of his depth, with negative implications for everything that follows.
    Tongue set firmly in cheek.

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    1. Stop feeding and reacting to the MC Troll, he loves it and is psychologically imbalanced. Do make allowances

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      1. 11:39;
        The only troll on this blog is you, ye goose. Are you threatened by MC or what? And stop being abusive by ‘gaslighting,’ calling people ‘psychologically imbalanced’. That’s not particularly Christian, nor is it humane.

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      2. Jealousy…as is usual for Magna haters
        11.39

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      3. Magna Carta is now posting anonymously at 2.33.

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      4. Magna Carta is now posting anonymously at 2.33.

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  3. Bishop Pat, with all due respect this is drivel! the notion (and I do use notion), that an academic of sorts can assert in some way that the matrimony of Patrick -without substantial evidence (Pre-famine) – is disingenuous in the least. Granted, there is no danger of erm……her Lordship warranting a spouse without due recognition of the ‘I’m heterosexual’ is itself laughable :). I digress!

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    1. 12:24 is not the real Magna: green avatar rather than blue.

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      1. Starve the MC ogre from attention

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    2. 10:02

      Thanks for the attention.

      You people never learn.😅

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      1. And Pat continues to give MC attention after telling us he faux disagrees with him yesterday. What a laugh

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    3. 4:58pm & 4:59pm are Siamese twin trolls.

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  4. Mirabile Visu
    During a freezing week in late January over here in Trumpistan interestingly enough I read Phil Rickman’s ‘ The Man In The Moss’ wherein the figure of Sheila was to play a role in the story. Her carving could be found at the entrance of a parish church which was taken down by the order of a zealous evangelical priest whose end was horrific
    Based on the image I have of Sheila … well, I dare not say more lest I suffer the fate of the wretched evangelical priest.

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  5. Bishop Pat, I was appalled to hear Brendan Marshall (slung out of Maynooth recently) not just pass himself of on BBC News tonight as a journalist but a photographer as well. He ran to the scene of the tragic Cookstown event, just a few miles from his home. He’s only started a course in journalism after being ejected by Armagh from Gaynooth. I have never heard such an awful interview by anyone on a programme such as BBC 5 live last night with Stephen Nolan, atrocious it was. Marshall managed to contradict the Assistant Chief Constables of the PSNI’s evaluation of events, it was painful and embarrassing to listen to. Get it on BBC radio 5 live catch up 2hrs 38 mins into the start of the programme. Can someone tell this fellow gently that he sounded like a buffoon. Nolan had to cut him off in the end for the much more professional Simpson. Total fool he sounded like.

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    1. Just listened to the interview. Brendan Marshall sounded a complete twat.

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      1. Brendan Marshall? Are you having a laugh? He was the main instigator of the Gaynooth saga. How could that moron be passing himself of as a journalist? Jesus wept and Jesus help us.

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      2. It was just nerves: stagefright.

        Mark Simpson is more experienced than Brendan Marshall.

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    2. Here’s the link. Brendan Marshall is on at the 2hrs 38 minutes mark. It is woeful. The BBC’s Mark Simpson (a real journalist) is on immediately afterwards and the contrast in quality is striking.

      https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00037yy

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      1. Thanks for the reference to bbc interview. Oh my God, why was this oaf allowed near a Seminary? Bishop Pat, is it true that Amy Martin is paying this guy’s journalism course at UUJ to keep him quiet? He’s been on a course for a few months and suddenly he’s a journalist for the BBC? Is it so easy Pat to be a journalist like yourself these days?

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      2. Marshall was one of the main players of Gaynooth. Now he’s passing himself of as a journalist helped by Armagh paying for his laughable journalism course. Just listen to that interview of him on BBC 5 live last night telks you all about him. It’s cringeworthy

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    3. If Brendan had any integrity he would have corrected the Nolan show staff beforehand or Stookie Nolan on air when he was introduced as a journalist. If he’d been honest and admitted that he was a journalism student he would not have been let on national radio. That fib will not impress his lecturers.

      And as for his unique assessment that young people just collapse with no assault or crush happening, contrary to what the PSNI said – what was that all about?

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      1. I’m sure that you could only truthfully call yourself a journalist if you’ve been published by a recognised media outlet and been paid for it either as a staffer or a freelance. Otherwise we are all journalists.
        It was a massive misjudgement for BM in the heat of the moment going along with being called a journalist. The BBC does not like being tricked as it has such a valuable brand to protect and it has a very long memory. Brendan’s moment of madness will haunt him.

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      2. This wasn’t the Nolan Show it was BBC 5 live. Marshall didn’t just introduce himself as merely a journalist but a photographer also. The interview was appalling based on rumours he had heard and contradicting the Assistant Chief Constable – could it be any worse? I can imagine what a gossip he must have been in Gaynooth.

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      3. Yes, totally agree. Brendan Marshall was reported so many times at Gaynooth but to no avail. Armagh suddenly drops him because Amy gets a bit uncomfortable about all the allegations. Stephen Nolan and the BBC, UTV, ITN, PA, Reuters all made aware of this person’s background.

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  6. Priest sentenced to 2.5 to 14 years for child abuse in Pennsylvania, US.
    https://www.google.ie/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2019/03/15/us/pennsylvania-priest-defrocked/index.html

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    1. 1:47pm
      Check out ‘Panodrama- an expose of the fake news BBC’, on YouTube.
      It’s not doing very well when it comes to protecting its valuable brand!

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    2. 6:52am
      Clerical child sex abusers in Pennsylvania have given a whole new meaning to Glen Millers, Pennsylvania 6-5000.

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    3. Leave Brendan alone and it wasn’t the same Brendan Marshall on the radio. It didn’t even sound like him.

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      1. Ffs are there two of them?

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  7. Bishop Pat, I’m glad that you are offering Mass today in honour of St Sheelagh; it helps somewhat to redress a long-standing injustice to women by the patriarchal Irish Church and its airbrushing out of possible history the role this woman might have played in Patrick’s mission.

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    1. Yes indeed. As we remember St Sheelagh we remember the millions of Irish Sheelaghs who were victims of church misogyny.

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      1. Speak for yourself, Pat. I let my missus have the tv remote control when I’m at work and she is able to put her feet up at 9.30 pm, unless there’s still woman’s work to do.

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      2. 9.19: Such faux concern! How many women are in ministry in your hay shed? You didn’t think much of the women whose sham marriages you performed purely for financial reasons! Did you mr. perfect? Crimes which briught much distress andcsufferingbto all cobcerned. A total, shameless and immoral abuse of vulnerable women. So don’t come on here lecturing other people. Hypocrite.

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    2. Starve the MC creature don’t reply or react to it.

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      1. I like Magna Carta. I also like Just Saying and the Holy Goat. I like a variety of opinions. I am more impressed by them than abusive bloggers. Mourn Mountain Man is also good. I miss Sean Page.

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      2. Sean may still be here???

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      3. 11.11: Indeed, Pat misses the many splinters in his own eyes…. and there are many. Hadn’t a word to say about St. Patrick on his Feast Day, yesterday and today engages in pure s**t. Tomorrow is the Feast of St. Joseph…..He’ll probably get the rough treatment too!!

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    3. 10:23
      Hah, hah, hah 😅
      Thanks for the publicity.👍
      I swear this is priceless.😅😅

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      1. Starve him.

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    4. 9.07: Let’s not forget the powerful women who founded religious orders: Mary Aikenhead (Sisters of Charity): Catherine NcAuley: (Mercy Sisters): Mother Mary Martin: (Medical Missionaries of Mary):Margaret Aylward:(Holy Faith Sisters): Nano Nagle: (Presentation Sisters): Sr. Kevin: (Missionary Sisters of Africa):….Formidable, strong, visionary, courageous and wonderful leaders in their Church and communities. We should acknowledge their contribution to the Church and society through education, medicine, missionary work, social outreach and now caring for the vulnerable of our society. Great women. And of course, St. Brigid – inspiration behind the Irish Brigidine Sisters who were founded by Bishop Delaney to provide education for Catholic women….. These are icons of our country.

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      1. Hear! Hear!

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      2. Excellent comment @ 2:55. I was taught by Mercy sisters and have only happy memories of them and they were good to adult relatives too in times of crisis. In Maynooth the Irish Daughters of Charity personified kindness in what could be a very harsh place. God Bless the Sisters!

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  8. Mr & Mr St Patrick in Larne?

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    1. 10:35
      Well, the Trinity IS a male threesome, traditionally understood, of course.😆

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      1. Magna Carta's Mum 18th Mar 2019 — 5:54 pm

        Magna, darling, language!

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    2. Sorry, Mommie Dearest.

      Thought you had popped out for some ‘retail therapy’.😆

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  9. Pure nonsense, you are as bad as Nolan.

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    1. Thanks Brenda

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  10. On this feast of St Sheelagh spare a thought for Timmy’s wife. He treats her like an old dogsbody so he does but she’s totally devoted to him. Isn’t it lovely to see in this day and age? Also say an Ave for all the Sheelaghs who live in Australia. There’s millions of them.

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    1. Tie me kangaroo down sport 18th Mar 2019 — 4:16 pm

      I totally agree about all the Sheelaghs in Oz. I lived there a little while and every bloke’s wife or girlfriend was called Sheelagh. Everyone of them. Was uncanny. “I was just saying to the Sheelagh the other day …… ”. “Me and the Sheelagh were out for dinner last night and ….. ” – that kind of thing.

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    2. @12.14 and everybody else
      For crying out loud, we spell it Sheila!!!!!!LL!L!L or Sile (fada on the i) i ngaelige.
      Are ye’s all effin thick?

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  11. Pat Mullaney had a brush with a waitress called Sheelagh one day dans le Cafe des Bum Bums over a stale croissant twasn’t a bit pleasant now so it twasn’t got a slap in the puss and ran home cryin did Mullaney Pat

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    1. Fixated and ill commentator alert.

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    2. Speaking of stale croissants, I’ve gone off vanilla flavoured anything at this stage, after last week’s blogs on Cardinal Pell. It’s plain ice cream for dessert today!

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  12. 10:54
    I like most of the people who write here under pseudonyms, e.g. “MMM”, “Kool Kat”, and real names, such as Pat and Sean Page.
    However, I find it hard to give any credence to much of what “JS” says because his posts are too changeable, contradictory and confused. They are also appear to be bombastic and condescending in nature with attempts to subtly sully victims of clerical sexual abuse.
    There is an observable consistency with the other mentioned posters, which obviously reflects their stable personalities and personally-held principles.
    I most certainly would not like to have somebody like “JS” as a friend. He comes across as far too unpredictable and untrustworthy.

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    1. Just Saying... 18th Mar 2019 — 2:23 pm

      Oh, dear, you do seem to have a thing about me, don’t you ? What’s your real problem ? If there are inconsistencies in what I write, or you find my posts unpredictable and untrustworthy, then simply point it out, line by line. Otherwise, I just think you might have obsession with me. Which seems strange. Not flattering at all, I assure you !

      Have any of the others of you notice over the last 10 days or so this character popping up and going on about me. Even on days when I haven’t posted. I’ve nothing particularly to add at St Patrick and his Missus, so wouldn’t have posted today. But, lo and behold, this oddball pops up moaning about me. Something strange there.

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      1. JS
        You are all over the place. Get over yourself. Nobody is obsessed by you.
        You sound as inflated as your posts. Self regarding twit.

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      2. 2.23: IS – stop digging the hole ….you’re delusional. Full of contradictions, predictability and too self adulating. You’re now becoming a pain. Just re-read your comments of recent times. Repetitive, confusing, all given in a lecturing style…far too long winded. Even Magna thinks so!!!🐴🐴

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      3. You don’t frighten anybody JS.
        You try to undermine victims and whistleblowers of clerical sexual abuse ever so vaguely. Such as Pell’s victims and whistleblowers.

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      4. Who or what are you JS? Priest? Retiree? Pervert defender?
        It appears you suffer from a multiple personality disorder based on your published comments.
        Go see a shrink! If you are not already doing so!

        Like

      5. Do you remember how you isolated poor Anthony Mc, JS, for a whole year…
        You won’t pull the same stunts here…

        Like

      6. @2.23 JS
        This person is not the brightest. He/ she may be a millennial – inability to see that facts on all sides need to be weighed up before reaching a conclusion/judgement.
        S/He has a thing about clerical child abuse -but can’t deal with individual cases rationally. I doubt they are any more against it than the rest of us, they just think they are.
        Of note: Chelsea Clinton being howled at as being responsible for NZ attack because she dared criticise Ilan Omar. Logic is foreign to them.
        This person is now trying to rally others to join in in the bullying of you. Ignore them.

        Like

      7. Hi JS @ 5:51pm.
        I am most surprised you didn’t write that you found yourself “intelligent” or “balanced”. Usual Campari fuelled self-aggrandizing drivel that we have to listen to…
        Go back to perusing your dated Freudian psychoanalytical books, especially the sections on wet dreams and phalluses, and your porno mags. They get far more viewing than your breviary, that’s for sure.
        It was a crying disgrace that you were allowed to wreak havoc in Maynooth for so long. You did your best to destroy men both spiritually and psychologically.
        And what you did to Anthony Mc, a vulnerable person in so many ways, was beyond despicable for a so-called “priest”.
        I have given you enough rope this far to hang yourself. No more.
        Every time you come back here from now on, I will annihilate you. It is your choice…Fr Preprandial…

        Like

  13. I met a BBC jouro in town earlier (full details on request to Pat if required using my email beginning with ern…) Stookie Nolan said that he was raging and felt duped and shown up and Brendan has been added to the BBC’s “CHECK & CLEAR BEFORE BROADCAST” list.

    Like

  14. Nothing strange ‘JS’, or ‘obsessive’.
    I and many others have just pointed out your glaring inconsistencies and anomalies, that’s all. They are there in black and white, and stretch back to your first appearance on this blog when revelations were made regarding a certain formator from Maynooth.
    With the other pseudonyms, I can always get a good idea of the underlying person. Not so with you.
    Let’s just say that I am good at smelling rats!
    Your days of isolating people with your amateurish psychological games are long gone.
    BTW, I was responding to another poster who mentioned your pseudonym.
    Get in touch with reality.

    Like

  15. Two Armagh rejects turned up at the scene in Cookstown. Fr Joe Quinn shown on BBC News at One today hanging around the scene. When he realised the camera was on him he turned his back – why? Marshall interviewed by Nolan was a total car crash interview. Nolan @2.24pm I’m in agreement was totally seething at the imbecile interview by Marshall.

    Like

    1. Just Saying... 18th Mar 2019 — 3:54 pm

      I see the other day it was “have a go at MC” day. Today seems to be “have a go at JS” day. Oh well, you will soon get bored. Maybe it’s just because todays subject – St Patrick – isn’t that inspiring, so you are looking for something else to entertain you ?

      Like

      1. Waste of oxygen…
        When you come in to enemy territory, you had better be sharp…

        Like

      2. JS

        Typical. Non-committal. Non-answer.

        You are a joke.

        Like

    2. Was Quinn dressed as a priest?

      Like

      1. It was hard to tell as he turned away so quickly from the camera.

        Like

      2. Quinn is not a priest anymore and Brady told him not to dress as one.

        Like

    3. Quinn is absolutely barking mad.

      Like

    4. Saw him too.

      Sweet Lord, he looked totally deranged! The made stare in his eyes before he turned his back to the camera.

      Surely to God he’s not still masquerading as a priest?

      It would be just like him to try and pass himself off as such, in such tragic circumstances, to people who wouldn’t necessarily know his history.

      He is one very crazy individual.

      Like

      1. *mad* stare – not “made” – sorry for typo.

        Like

  16. Even when not commenting, you are keeping a constant indeed, it seems, nervous eye on this blog, JS.
    I believe that you have major skeletons from your past that haunt you and which you are petrified could be exposed any day.
    You thought you could play your psychological games on Pat by ingratiating yourself with him and by trying to get him to muzzle MC.
    You come across as a vacillating sycophant.
    You don’t fool me…

    Like

    1. Just Saying... 18th Mar 2019 — 5:18 pm

      What a nitwit you are, 3:44. Only skeleton I have is the one on which lies my flesh. I think you’re turning in to a bit of a trolling bully. Subtle, but trying to be a threat, all the same. Bye, bye….

      Like

      1. Yeah, run along now you little perv,’JS’.

        You better pray you never meet me in real life…

        Stay the f**k in England, if you have sense…

        Like

      2. You are lying JS…I can feel the fear coming through your pathetic posts…

        Like

      3. JS

        You fooled Fr Marsden into believing that you were abused by Fr Ronan Drury.

        Lying little scumbag.

        You live in Laa Laa Land.

        Like

    2. Another anonymous post from one of the Magna Carta posters.

      Like

  17. I always thought St Patrick’s wife was called Gloria! Sure didn’t we grow up singing “Hail, Gloria’s St Patrick”? Totally confused now.

    Like

    1. Hah, hah, hah 😅
      Brilliant wit.
      Give youself a slap on the back…from yours truly😆

      Like

    2. Yes, very entertaining indeed. Reminds me of the night Maggie Carta went missing. Paddy’s weekend last year. Gone for 3 days he was. Sergeant Murphy found him three days later wandering up main street at 7am with a fag in one hand and a bottle of bulmers in the other singing ‘I who have nothing’. God bless the mark.

      Like

      1. 6:53

        I shan’t be churlish: my face did crease at your post, a little, but it did crease.😆

        Like

      2. ShirleyTempleBar 18th Mar 2019 — 7:45 pm

        I’m sat at my desk writing an assignment and i cant stop laughing @ 6;53. I who have nothing LOL

        Like

  18. Since St Patrick was an immigrant to these Shores surely after Brexit we should stop the celebration in Northern Ireland? 😂😂😂
    We’ll have to wait until Bishop Pat’s beatification until we celebrate St Patrick’s Day again!

    Like

    1. Timmy didn’t leave the toilet all night. he said it was my bacon and cabbage. I said it might be the four tubs of Ben and Jerry’s, the rhubarb tart and two bottles of vodka.

      Like

  19. Donald J. Trump 18th Mar 2019 — 5:40 pm

    Bishop Patrick Buckley from the Northern United Kingdom is a wonderful wonderful guy. great guy. terrific. fantastic. other bishops? LOSERS! believe me!

    Like

  20. OMG just listened to the “journalist/photographer” Marshall interview with Nolan on BBC Radio 5! Criiiiiiiiiinge!! 😖 😂Talk about a car crash interview?? Made a total d**k of himself. Don’t think journalism is the career for Brenda either. 🥴😝

    Like

    1. Obsessive! clearly he rejected you. awwww *hugs*

      Like

      1. @#GetOverIt – I’d say munter Marsha, the well known journalist and photographer, had more than her share of rejections 😂😂😂

        Like

  21. Hi – how did Mr. and Mr. Bucko get over St. Patrick’s weekend? Any fun? Let us in on your secrets….

    Like

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