HOW CATHOLIC CHURCH USED ITS OWN TREATMENT CENTRES TO SHELTER PRIEST ABUSERS.

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SERVANTS OF THE PARACLETE CENTRE IN NEW MEXICO

Monsignor William Lynn was the first U.S. Catholic Church official to be convicted of covering up clergy sex abuse. After Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court vacated Lynn’s conviction, he faces another trial this year. (AP file photo)
In 1995, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops commissioned an internal church study on child abuse. The two-volume study surveyed bishops in more than 100 dioceses nationwide about their use of treatment centers to assess and care for priests believed to be sexually abusing children.
The result: 87% of bishops (127 out of 145 dioceses surveyed) reported using treatment centers for clergy accused of child abuse.
Two decades later, following the August release of the Pennsylvania grand jury report on sex abuse in the Catholic Church — one of three released by the state attorney general since early 2000  — dioceses in multiple states and at least one state attorney general have disclosed their own lists of credibly accused priests.
The Pennsylvania report focuses on many small towns throughout the state. One of those towns — mentioned more than a dozen times — is an outlier. It’s a town you wouldn’t think to look for unless, like me, you were born and raised there.
In 2002, around the same time the Boston Globe published its bombshell report on sexual abuse of children in Archdiocese of Boston, I was a freshman at Bishop Shanahan, a Catholic high school in Downingtown, Pennsylvania.
I don’t remember paying much attention to the Boston Globe report. Nor was I aware that, during this same time, multiple priests accused of child abuse were being sent to a clergy treatment center directly across the street from my high school.
Downingtown is home to the longest-running behavioral health facility in North America still in use by the Catholic Church. It’s a place where  —  according to the reports  —  at least 50 priests accused of molesting children in Pennsylvania were referred for evaluation and treatment.
That treatment time was often referred to in their employment history as “sick leave,” and many priests were inevitably discharged and permitted to return to active ministry. Others were transferred to church-run retirement homes where they received fully paid benefits. The church commonly called that retreat a “life of prayer and penance.”
St. John Vianney Center
Founded in 1946, the St. John Vianney Center in Downingtown is staffed by clergy, psychologists, and nurses. It offers inpatient and outpatient services for behavioral and emotional issues, addiction, compulsive behaviors, and weight management. It is fully funded and administered under the purview of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.
In detail, the grand jury report  — much like the 1995 USCCB study  — offers rare insight into the church’s use of “treatment” centers, the psychiatric facilities for clergy with addiction, depression, and sexual disorders, among other conditions. According to the grand jury report, the Catholic Church used these treatment centers to “launder accused priests, provide plausible deniability, and permit hundreds of known offenders to return to ministry.”
The report goes on further to state that Catholic bishops relied on three treatment centers in particular: Servants of the Paraclete in Jemez Springs, New Mexico; St. Luke’s in Suitland, Maryland; and St. John
Vianney Center. All three remain open.
Downingtown, less than an hour south of Philadelphia, is no stranger to scandal involving the church. Most recently, in 2017, a pastor at the nondenominational Calvary Fellowship Church, across the street from Downingtown East High School, pleaded guilty to institutional sex assault, corruption of minors, and child
endangerment after sexually assaulting and impregnating a teenage girl. He was sentenced to up to six years in prison.
Five years earlier, Monsignor William Lynn  —  who was serving at St. Joseph’s parish across the street from Downingtown West High School  —  became the first high-ranking U.S. Catholic Church official to be convicted of covering up clergy sex abuse. In addition to three priests and a parochial school teacher, Lynn was
charged and convicted of one count of endangering the welfare of a child. He is now free after serving nearly three years of his three- to six-year sentence. He may face another trial on the charges this year.
St. Joseph’s Church in Downingtown remains the second largest parish in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The recently renovated facade, with its towering white steeple, sits just off Route 322. Every Sunday, parishioners fill the parking lot before Mass. Every summer, the same lot is transformed into the annual Community Festival: a five-day carnival that is a hallmark of the small suburb.
On the opposite side of town is St. John Vianney Center. Unlike St. Joseph’s parish, on display as a beacon to area Catholics, the treatment center is hidden from public view. It sits at the end of a long driveway at the top of a hill, surrounded by trees and nestled between a country club and Bishop Shanahan High School across the street.
The only clue toward its existence is a small sign outside the entrance. It’s a fitting appearance for a place shrouded in a culture of secrecy characteristic of the church itself.
A look at two cases
One of the four men charged along with Lynn  in 2012 was the Rev. Edward Avery, who  received treatment at St. John Vianney over the course of four days from Nov. 30 to Dec. 3, 1992. Following his evaluation, the treatment center recommended further in-patient care. Philadelphia Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, who had allowed Avery to remain in active ministry for nearly 11 months after his victim first reported the abuse to the archdiocese, approved the recommendation.
Avery was discharged from St. John Vianney on Oct. 22, 1993. In a memo to the church, Lynn shared the treatment center’s recommendations for Avery, which included a ministry excluding adolescents and with a population other than vulnerable minorities. The treatment center also advised that an aftercare team supervise Avery.
Yet Lynn recommended that Avery return to a parish with an elementary school, and Bevilacqua ultimately agreed. Avery would later testify before the grand jury that he continued to celebrate Mass, with altar servers, usually twice a weekend. He heard the confessions of children and was never told to restrict his activities with the youth of the parish.
The aftercare team that was supposed to be supervising Avery didn’t meet with him for more than a year after he ended treatment. Furthermore, the chaplain at St. John Vianney warned Lynn that Avery was “neglecting his duties” and instead “booking numerous disc jockey engagements” to gain access to children. Avery remained in active ministry until Dec. 5, 2003, a decade after first receiving treatment.
Avery’s case is one of many revealing exactly how the Catholic Church used St. John Vianney and other treatment centers to launder accused priests and, in some cases, return them to ministry in defiance of the treatment center’s own recommendations.
And while it’s worth noting that many of the allegations contained within the grand jury report are from decades ago, the case studies involving treatment centers cover allegations ranging from as early as the 1960s to as recent as 2004.
In a separate case, on April 22, 2004, diocesan documents show that Pennsylvania State Police searched the room of the Rev. Ronald Yarrosh  —  then assistant pastor at St. Ambrose in Schuylkill Haven  —  and found a “tremendous amount” of child pornography.
A week later, he was suspended from ministry and placed into treatment at St. John Vianney.
Across the street, I was just about to finish my sophomore year of high school.
On May 12, 2004, State Police filed charges: 110 counts of sexual abuse of children. Yarrosh was sentenced pursuant to a negotiated plea agreement that included three to 23 months in prison. He was discharged from St. John Vianney on May 3, 2005, and was later incarcerated for nearly four months until his release on Dec. 6, 2005, as a convicted and registered sex offender.
According to the grand jury report, upon his release, Yarrosh remained a member of the priesthood and the diocese granted him residence at a retirement home for priests in Orwigsburg — only a few miles from St. Ambrose parish where he had been arrested two years earlier.
In 2006, according to the grand jury report, Yarrosh took trips to New York City with a 7-year-old. Yarrosh was also found to be in possession of pornography in violation of his court supervision. He was sentenced to
four to 10 years in state prison. In June 2007, the Yarrosh was finally dismissed from the priesthood.
The current president of St. John Vianney, David Shellenberger, did not return requests for an interview.
Time for a mea culpa
I’ve driven past St. John Vianney hundreds of times in my life. I spent four years, every day, directly across the street. And yet, I never knew what that place was until I discovered it on my own, by accident, reading the grand jury report.
Much like the abusive priests written about in the reports, the truth was always hiding in plain sight. If the Catholic Church is serious about reform within the priesthood, it will do more than simply condemn the accused.
The church must acknowledge and recognize that bishops across the country have, for decades, institutionalized a culture that not only fosters abusive priests but also aims to protect the accused and silence victims. Simply put, the only reason child abuse has become an epidemic is because the Catholic Church has allowed it to happen.
What the #MeToo era revealed, beyond a litany of heinous acts committed by sexual predators, is that the allegations themselves rarely tell the full story. Instead — whether it be the Catholic Church or Michael Jackson or Jeffrey Epstein — the full story often involves those in power exploiting their influence and privilege to circumvent the criminal justice system and maintain the appearance of infallibility.
Perhaps the first step toward reform in the Catholic Church is a collective confirmation that members of the clergy are no more pious than anyone else. They are, in fact, only human — some of them deeply flawed — and all of them in need of self-reflection.
Perhaps, a life of prayer and penance is in order

ST LUKES MARYLAND STAFF

songy-david-web-218x300
FR DAVID SONGY OFM CAP PRESIDENT
gordon-jim-web-218x300
FR JAMES GORDON PH. D DIRECTOR OF CLINICAL SERVICES

 

MISSION STATEMENT OF ST LUKE CENTRE WASHINGTON
We participate in the healing ministry of Christ by promoting the health and well-being of Catholic clergy and women and men religious in the United States and abroad. To accomplish this task, we provide mental health treatment, offer education and wellness programs, and conduct research. In these services, we strive to integrate the highest quality spiritual, psychological and physical resources within the context of a Christian community. The Institute conducts its ministry in harmony with the teachings of the Catholic Church.

Vision Statement

As a multi-service Institute, our Vision calls us to reach out in compassionate care to serve those who serve others in communities of faith. This vision calls us to:
Treat men and women with a broad range of difficulties in living
Widen our outreach to women religious
Expand our educational offerings and wellness programs
Respond to emerging needs of those in ministry
Research and disseminate knowledge about the care of people in ministry
Reach out to the wider community for support
Explore providing services to other local Churches and cultures
Invite conversation around critical issues impacting those in ministry
Offer consultation services to bishops and major superiors
Core Values

The love of Christ urges us to conduct our ministry with compassion, respect and quality service. These core values inspire our mission and vision.

PAT SAYS:

Bishops, priests and religious who abuse and have other problems need help.

Part of me thinks that these services should be provided by professionally qualified lay people that are not under the influence of The Vatican, the hierarchy or religious superiors.

Its all to easy for the church to influence these centres in ways that are not professional.

In the past many bishops and superiors did use these centres to hide abusers away.

And after release many were sent back into ministry and to abuse again.

 

 

56 thoughts on “HOW CATHOLIC CHURCH USED ITS OWN TREATMENT CENTRES TO SHELTER PRIEST ABUSERS.

  1. Pat Mullaney always cryin poverty so she is very bad tipper in the Bum de dee Bum Cafeteria the waitresses makin faces at her behind her back and callin her a tight oul yoke and the moths flyin outa the purse declare til God

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  2. Bishop Pat and the Blog Readership
    Thank you for your post on matters concerning’ Treatment Centres’ for clergy credibly accused of the sexual abuse of children and other ‘ills’
    I had been aware of the Southdown Institute in Canada and its use by diocesan bishops and Religious Superiors outside Canada for the ‘treatment’ of its own sexual abusing clergy and religious. I often wondered what people in Canada would think about sex abusing clergy from outside the jurisdiction being ‘parked’ in their own country. If it was me I would be deeply alarmed at such behaviour.
    I refer the readers to this New York Times article on the treatment of clerical sex abusers. In the article it states that The Rev. Gerald M. C. Fitzgerald, founder of the order, Servants of the Paraclete entrusted with the treatment of such offending clergy stated back in 1952 that pedophiles should be removed from the priesthood because they could not be cured.
    The full text
    https://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/03/us/03church.html
    There is no cure or even effective treatment, It is a pathological condition.
    About time the bishops and religious superiors admitted this truth and dealt effectively with such criminal clergy.

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    1. MournemanMichael 17th Apr 2019 — 9:46 am

      Natlog: Your penultimate sentence should underpin any response to child sexual abuse by an adult.
      “There is no cure or even effective treatment: it is a pathological condition.”
      I do not like references to dealing with sexual abusers which refer to “treatment” as it can infer that after “treatment the abuser is “cured.” Such a response has been the utterly naive approach of most of the RC hierarchy.
      On this blog site a few days ago I outlined some basic requirements for dealing with child sexual abusers. The quotation above underpins that approach.
      MMM

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      1. 9.46: MMM – I believe that there is no total guarantee that any abuser can be cured. Treatment through care, support, awareness, education and counselling should be given to abusers. When back in the community after prison, surely it’s vital that some vigilant after care is provided. That would be in the best interest for child protection. I don’t believe that sexual abusers are ever totally cured. Incidentally, many Bishops sought the professional advice and help from eminent psychiatrists in the late 70’s, early 80’s re: how to deal with abusing clergy. In some instances they were informed that it was ‘safe’ to allow an abuser back into ministry, havingvsiught “professsional” therapy. MMM, we’re you as aware of the pathological nature of sexual abuse back then? Were you aware of the manipulative, clever grooming techniques and power control of potential abusers? I was born in the late 50’s and was aware of unsafe people in the community. I never knew what that meant for many years. In the seminary, we rarely heard the word “abuser” or “recidivist abuser”. We were told something about boundaries, about personal responsibility, about respecting the bodily integrity of others. I know so much more now since the late 80’s and I’m still learning. I believe most of us are still learning, sadly. This is in no way to minimise any person’s experience of sexual abuse in any era. Abuse of any kind at any time is repulsive.

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    2. 10.32: And what have you to say about Pat’s admission recently that he gives sanctuary to released offenders of all kinds, including sexually abusing offenders? Isn’t it a Christian rhing to do in seeking to support and ensure that care of some kind is given. It’s better for child protection. We cannot have lynch mob style justice.

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      1. 11:58am
        Eminent psychiatrists. Bulls***.
        Do you know anything about psychiatric corruption and abuse.
        Those lads and lassies are pseudo medics, pill pushers for big pharma.
        They aspire to be accepted in the medical community as real doctors.
        Don’t be shifting blame. This covering up for abusing priests is still going on today.

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      2. Isn’t every psychiatrist a qualified medical doctor first?

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  3. For clarity, such retreat centres are used to treat any priest found to have broken his chastity. If you know a priest sent to such a place please do not jump to the worst of conclusions. In some cases the thirt party involved is a fully consenting adult. I am not making excuses; but there is a difference between those who struggle with chastiy and those who abuse children.

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    1. 7:57am
      HG, there must be a hell of a waiting list to access these ‘ retreat centres’ or are they psycho/sexual clinics/treatment centres ? Who pays for the ‘retreats’ or ‘treatment’?

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      1. Ultimately the Sheep pay for everything. Although i have been known to contribute to the collection plate too. Fair is fair, I pray mass in the parish church just like the rest of the parishioners.

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    2. @12.25
      Just to clarify your assertions.
      Psychiatrists ARE medically qualified doctors FIRST.
      They then choose to specialise in psychiatry, just as other medical graduates go on to specialise in surgery, general practice, obstetrics, gerontology etc.
      Whether or not they are more open to abuse to pharmaceutical reps than g.p.’s for example I don’t know.
      Psychiatry is the very poor relation of physical medicine – hence the ongoing clamour for better mental health care we see today. Whether they get lazy and not as much is expected of them by relatives is another question.
      Psychologists are, of course, a different profession.
      Because they deal with the ‘mind’ and behaviour, the efficacy of any treatment approach cannot be proven the same as in physical medicine.
      But psychiatrists ARE doctors. It’s probably just not as socially prestigious as calling yourself a cardiologist.
      Maybe that says more about us.

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      1. 3:13- Psychiatry as a specialism is modern day quackery.
        It’s a pseudo medical specialism totally in the pockets of big pharma.
        Educate yourself on psychiatric corruption and where it gets its funding to train psychiatrists and how it’s bible the DSM is created.

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    3. Is there a hospital for lay people who have “broken their chastity”?
      Sounds like The Handmaid’s Tale somehow.

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  4. 7.57: Pat doesn’t like any narrative or truth but his own, which is always biased, prejudices and self serving. He spins too much……Even in Holy Week, he’d row with Jesus himself and tell him he shouldn’t have sacrificed himself on the cross. Pat thinks he knows best……he doesn’t.

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    1. But he certainly knows more, and understands more than a helluva lot who make stupid vacuous banal comments on this blog!

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      1. 9.03: Really…Pat knows only what he chooses to believe, which is never the entire truth! His narrative is all that matters..

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    2. @8:49am.

      Who do you think Jesus on the cross would MORE LIKELY identify with; men in the brotherhood, with oiled hands, wearing pointy hats and colourful vestments, who covered up and continue to cover up, for criminals in the brotherhood, for the ‘ good of the church’.

      Or, would Jesus on the cross be MORE LIKELY to identify with, those humilitated, degraded, and abused, on multi levels of their being, including spiritual abuse,….for the ‘ good of the church’.?

      Who do you think Jesus might argue with?

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    3. @5.58
      Yes, there is a lot of drug use, but in some respects less than before. USA is a different matter. I agree they medicate their children for very little. Here ADHD, for eg., is very carefully diagnosed and monitored. Younger psychiatrists tend to medicate much less. My adult relative was taken off all medication for their condition and fellow patients likewise.
      Unfortunately, until greater research produces answers, medication for psychotic conditions such as schizophrenia is necessary – as tragic homicides in N. Ireland have shown, with the perpetrators either having had delays in referral or stopped taking their medication.
      I’d still rather have psychiatrists than not have them. I do not believe they are ‘bad and immoral’ doctors and physical doctors are ‘good and moral’ ones.

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      1. 6:29 pm
        Rubbish.
        There’s more drug use and ONLY drugs used by psychiatrists.
        Infants as young as 3 years of age
        are being medicated in America by psychiatrists for bi-polar, anxiety disorders, and other so called disorders.
        You don’t know what your talking about with ADHD and ADD and ignorance is bliss.
        Younger psychiatrists nonsense.
        They have nothing else to offer people but drugs. Contrary to popular belief psychotic disorders can be treated without drug dependency. Much cheaper not to and more profitable for big Pharma to drug people. Research…is paid for by big Pharm…to create a narrative for over 50 years or more.
        Psychiatry is CORRUPT.
        It’s an ideology not a science.
        Read Dr. Peter Breggins book Toxic Psychiatry.
        He’s known as the conscience of psychiatry. Google his website beggin.com for an
        insight into what’s
        going on in Psychiatry
        and Mental Health in the western world.
        Wise up Priests and opeople.

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  5. Thanks for whaling me pat.

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    1. What does “whaling” mean?

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    2. @9.35
      You cannot allow people having a psychotic episode out on the street without medication. Otherwise the neighbours will possibly, and literally have been many times, butchered.
      I agree USA medicate children WAY too much and I wouldn’t medicate mine.However, our brain works by chemicals and sometimes help is needed as a last resort.
      If I lived next door to you and you had a relative having an unmedicated psychotic episode, I would bolt all my windows and doors and be very, very worried.
      Your experience of psychiatry is not everyone’s.
      Yes, drug companies try to pedal their wares – but they do in physical medicine too. Overuse of antibiotics by gp’s leading to resistance, overprescribing of painkillers by gp’s leading to addiction, overprescription of anti depressants by gp’s leading to addiction, continued debate on the benefits/dangers of statins, debate over the mmr vaccine in children versus single dose vaccines, debate over non disclosure of very severe / fatal reactions in teenage girls to the new hpv vaccine, gastric surgery versus losing weight, cosmetic surgery for enhancement, vaginal mesh surgery…………….. physical medicine has its scandals too.
      As to your author, he may make some valid points, but he is also selling his book.

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      1. @11:30pm

        Alarmist and cynical.
        Where did I say medication is never
        to be used? I didn’t.
        I said psychotic problems can be sorted without drug DEPENDENCY or relying only on drugs.
        I’d be far more concerned about those who claim sanity and the dangers some pose particularly to children.
        Dr. Peter Breggin is selling books like everyone else who write books but he’s done and doing more than most to help people including children and to highten awareness of psychiatric/big pharma corruption.

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  6. 10 28: Pat, who paid for your counselling, psypsychotherapy and various courses you’ve done over the years? Who pays you??? The SHEEP who visit Larne of course and the sheep who ask you to officiate at ceremonies up and down the country and abroad? Why are you scathing and cynical about the Catholic “sheep”. You lived off them for the early years of ministry!! However you try, you’ll never, ever convince me that your SHEEP are better than Catholic sheep! Come on Pat, be honest: You rely on the sheep’s offerings/droppings as much as Catholic Priests…..

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    1. I’m not scathing about the sheep. I’m more concerned about the shepherds who fleece them 😥

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      1. 11.40: Pat, parishioners give out of their generosity to the support of their clergy, deserved or undeserved. Some choose to give nothing; that’s ok with me, others are very generous. Surely you too can be accused of fleecing your small congregation or those for whom you provide services, since you do charge a fee! After all, where money is concerned anything is possible. However, under new Charities Act, all income, including stipends and stole fees are accurately recorded and the names of donors must also be recorded for traceability in the event of an audit by revenue. I Don’t know what procedures your Society follow but the parish I administer is audited by independent lay people. So, fleecing is not possible…..receiving offerings is still legitimate.

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      2. 11.40: Pat, aren’t you a shepherd of the sheep that attend your Oratory…? What’s the difference? And don’t you depend on the offerings of your sheep to keep you in living? What’s the difference between the fleecing, as you call it, by Catholic clerics and your fleecing? None. You’re all receiving money one way or another!

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  7. The comments above are right to criticise the word treatment as it implies there is a condition which can be corrected by external action in these people. Nowhere is the idea of a risk assessment mentioned, though, which is really what should underpin future planning for sex offenders. What really horrifies me when the files of priest paedophiles have been released (usually when forced by courts in the US) is how frequently these centres tell bishops a priest should not be returned to ministry and this is ignored by the bishop. In some cases where the priest has consistently minimised his own guilt, accepted no responsibility and just gone on to offend again, the centre he was sent to has clearly indicated he was an ongoing danger.
    The point I’m trying to make is that these centres can provide expertise in predicting when an offender will offend again, and in detecting psychopathy which would contribute to this, if bishops and major superiors would only take their advice.

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    1. Bishops and hierarchy including Pope Paul VI were told years ago by Fr. Fitzgearld
      founder of the Servants of the Paraclete of the dangers pedophiles in ministry posed. The hierarchy didn’t
      listen to or heed his advice. Fitzgerald wanted to buy an island and took steps to purchase one.
      The purchase was blocked by the hierarchy. This is not a scandal but a 35 year ongoing running issue in the public domain which was going on behind the scenes on the quiet for generations.

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      1. 12:25
        Catholic psychiatrist Denis Lane O Kelly named in the Murphy Report into the Archdiocese of Dublin, was also a member of the Knights of Columbanus. He worked in Waterford and caused mayhem destroying God only knows how many lives.The cover ups around him continue to this day even though he died around 2003. He let loose one of Dublins most notorious abusers Fr. Bill Carney and most likely others not named or mentioned in the report. O Kelly was considered an eminent psychiatrist. Turned out he was sexually molesting and abusing some of those who sought his assistance. Amnesty International Ireland called for an investigation into serious flaws in the psychiatric system years ago. Another scandal in plain sight.

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      2. @12.55
        EXCELLENT idea. They should be on an island and if they are truly repentant then they should be content to be there and avoid all occasion of sin.
        Good for Father Fitzgerald!

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  8. The Servants of the Paraclete place in Jemez Springs, New Mexico, closed years ago. I think that they moved into another line of work.

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  9. Pat Mullaney when is your new book coming out

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  10. 12.25: I merely speak the truth. There is no attempt in my part to shift blame but let’s not forget what I said: eminent psychiatrists did advise bishops, rightly or wrongly and as professionals, their views and analysis were important. Of course bishops must own their wrongful decision, coverbups and corrupt practices. We now know how seriously wrong tgey were on many occasions. Sadly. I know in my Diocese our bishop is very proactive re: abuse and cover ups. Thankfully we all know the morally right thing to do.

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    1. Let’s have an independent audit of all dioceses.

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  11. The St Luke’s Instuite in Manchester is a real house of horrors, it’s like a hotel decorated with the statues left behind when it stopped being a convent, they process all of the UKs candidates for the priesthood it’s not fit for that purpose and any psychological interviews should be held in a totally secular context, the obsession with masturbation is abusive, a nun in her seventies asks you when did you last masturbate and how did you feel? She thinks it’s something that a teenage boy would do a few times then grow out of it in time for marriage, not a clue about human sexuality, she thinks seminaries are places of great holiness even though the priests in charge are as camp as could be , bizarre in 2019!

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    1. My friend was assessed at St Luke’s and was asked 7 questions about wanking by an elderly lady. He was even asked if he enjoyed it and about ejaculation. Really? They are all nuts.

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      1. God I still have those bizarre questionnaires they asked to be filled out prior to going to St Lukes. I thought i had actually lost them. They weren’t too impressed when i arrived without them. 3 booklets full of questions to be answered. My favourite part was when they sent the menu in advance to ensure we were not allergic to anything.

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      2. Those Nuns don’t know if they are coming or going bless them.

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      3. Extraordinary to hear these old bags are still in business. In the eighties Allen Hall was swarming with the sisterhood as “experts” in good parish practice ( my arse, as Jim Royle would say ) while pouring over the lives of the queens. Hard to know now which were more ridiculous: the old harridans spouting nonsense about preferential option for the poor while returning each day to vast mansions in the poshest parts of Kensington or the “lads” milking the system – not to mention each other, if you’d pardon the crudity. Never heard of St Luke’s, but doesn’t sound as if much has changed. There used to be a sinister house of preparation at Osterley, which felt like a borstal. Closed now, I daresay, but I doubt anything has been learnt – and above anecdotes confirm that. How can any priest or religious be taken seriously? Did we ever find out what happened to the ex Provost of the Oxford Oratory by the way?

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  12. A fellow Priest was sent off to said place in Canada who had a major issue with porn, cottaging and grinder. Was there for a month and upon leaving he was told “you arent the problem, your Bishop is the problem for not accepting you”. Money well spent.

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  13. Fly On Th Wall 17th Apr 2019 — 9:03 pm

    In house treatment centres hi. Is there a tendency to be biased towards predetermined outcome. Anyways look at the result of Church lead education but. Many a wan benefitted from it but this is no excuse for damage caused to many others. Institutional control must give way to following the Way of the Lord hi Is the Lord still on the board of directors hi

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    1. Nite fly hi. Begorra fly the Lord counts for too little. And the little childer count less.
      Too many treated let free to harm more little childer in poor parts of the towns and country.
      Butt the Man above had a spy in his band. There’s always the one. Bye fly hi.

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    2. @9.03
      If I wanted to listen to Ballymena I’d move there.
      I need to offload! Your posts are damaging my nerves. They are like nails down a blackboard. Irritating to the point of mental torture.
      Do us all a favour. STOP!

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      1. Fly On Th Wall 18th Apr 2019 — 8:05 am

        9.03 The point is to challenge Are your challenged hi

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  14. The aged nun who was a ‘vocational growth counsellor’ in Maynooth finally got too old and was retired and not replaced. Why they thought she’d have insight into being a priest is beyond me. She had no novices in her order.
    She likewise was obsessed with asking how often you wanked and how you felt before, during and after.

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    1. @8.05
      NOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!
      Just driven up the bloody walls! Stop it!!
      The excruciating Ballymena thing drowns out anything you might actually have to say. If a man has dirty, filthy, long, disgusting fingernails he might have the most gentlest touch in the world – but he’s not getting near me! Your adopted persona has the same effect. Makes my skin crawl.

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    2. at 5.11 a.m.
      You’d have been better off saying a decade of the rosary if you couldn’t sleep at that hour of the morning instead of writing what you wrote.

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    3. How does these places function unchecked? Catholic schools in England put Ofsted first and teaching how to be a lapsed Catholic second, how would any candidate to the priesthood today even know the Church had a teaching on masturbation?? Are they saying we wouldn’t ever say anything in public but in private we want to know how often how did you feel when was the last time? Surely this is an abuse it’s not a discussion amongst adults in a non judgemental way it’s totally loaded, a friend of mine told me about his assement and I thought it was horrific on every level and then they produce a document which is read over surely this isn’t how you recognise if someone’s a danger to children or not ??

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  15. Fly on the wall, your contributions are not fit for adult human forums such as this one. If you want to say something, learn the conventions of adult discourse. If you can’t master them, it’s unlikely you have anything profitable to contribute. I’d recommend prayer, fasting (especially from this blog) and alms giving for starters.

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    1. 8:05 am

      Hello fly hi.
      Beggora Fly I’m with for challengin and changin.
      Some people are uppset easilly hi and in need of long sufferin like th ravished lambs.
      Bye fly hi.

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      1. @3.11
        Dear God, you’re even worse!
        I may offer it up.

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  16. MournemanMichael 18th Apr 2019 — 10:57 pm

    Pat: can you please clarify why some comments have no facility of replying directly?
    I’ve asked before when, as above, I wished to reply directly to a comment. Thanks
    MMM

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  17. Good Nite annoneyous at 9:57pm tonite.

    A little offerin for th sake of th lambs.
    Good Nite to ye.

    Like

  18. The Church has no reason to be running psychological instuites or treatment centres , they can’t possibly have the right expertise as they are starting with a bias and all of thats cases prove that there is no call from God for this work it’s being used to perpetuate problems

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