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TODAYS BLOG ON FRENCH SCANDAL SUBMITTED BY BLOG COMMENTATOR.

TOO GOOD TO BE JUST A COMMENT

The French Catholic Church has for years protected priests and others under its authority who were accused of sexual assaults, and paedophile crimes in particular.


This Mediapart investigation reveals how 25 bishops, five of who are still active, were directly involved in protecting 24 people, mostly priests, accused of sexual
abuse.


They were among 32 alleged perpetrators of sex crimes who are identified here as having been protected by the Church, and whose alleged victims total 339. The method employed often involved the transfer of the alleged perpetrators, a number of who have now been convicted for sex crimes, to distant geographical locations both in France and abroad.


Revealed: the 25 French bishops who covered up sex crimes


Several dozen priests accused of sexual assaults were knowingly and methodically protected by 25 bishops who were aware of their alleged crimes and who never alerted the judicial authorities to the events, Mediapart can reveal in a year-long investigation into cases of sexual abuse, either alleged or since confirmed, involving members of the French Catholic Church.

The Catholic Church turned a blind eye to the cases of more than 300 victims of abuse across France, according to hundreds of documents, including judicial reports, witness accounts, letters and archived press reports gathered in this investigation.
The majority of the perpetrators eventually became the subject of judicial investigations, after which some were sent for trial and convicted, while others among them are currently formally placed under investigation, a legal status one step short of being charged and which implies that there is serious or corroborative evidence they committed an offence. But there are also cases of formal complaints which the French justice system has dismissed on the grounds of the statute of limitations (under which prosecution of an alleged crime is impossible due to the length of time that has passed before a complaint was lodged). We have chosen to cite the cases in this category when evidence we have obtained (judicial documents, confessions, and concordant witness accounts) support the accusations.


This investigation has established that from the 1960s to date, and notably since the year 2000, at least 32 priests and other religious and lay figures accused of sexual crimes against minors and adults were protected by the French Catholic church both in France and abroad. A total of 25 bishops, five of whom are still in activity, were alerted to the evidence of sexual abuse but never lodged formal complaints with the police or judicial authorities. The scandal involves 339 alleged victims.


The French Catholic Church insists that the events are a thing of the past, and numerous bishops have claimed that the Church’s attitude towards sexual abuse allegations changed in the early 2000s. According to that account, the sex abuse cases implicating members of the Church that emerged last year (see here, here, and here) were isolated and old, and covered by the statute of limitations.


Our investigation shows that to be false. Half of the cases of alleged sexual abuse which were covered up by the Church concern incidents that occurred after the year 2000. A total of 28 clerics were transferred to Directeur de la publication : Edwy Plenel http://www.mediapart.fr 2 2/5 other geographical locations following the disclosure of the alleged abuse, and without the justice system being alerted to the events.


However, the law is very clear on the requirement that anyone who is aware of evidence of such crimes must inform the relevant authorities, and a document prepared by the Conference of Bishops of France (the CEF), the French Catholic Church’s Episcopal assembly, underlines this. First published in 2002, and re-published in 2010 and 2017, the CEF document (see right) warns: “When someone is made aware of a crime (it should be noted that rape is a crime) or precise facts concerning privation, mistreatment or sexual assault on minors of less than 15 years of age, they must inform the justice authorities. In this case, no distinction should be made on the basis of the status of the alleged perpetrator. That they be a priest, a lay tutor or a member of the victim’s family, denunciation is imperative. Articles 434#1 and 434#3 of the penal code provide for a punishment of three years in prison and a fine of 45,000 euros for the non-denunciation of such acts.”


Of the 32 alleged perpetrators identified in this investigation, 24 were directly covered up by a total of 25 bishops. The other cases were covered up by superiors, priests and others who were alerted to the events and who took no action. None of the prelates were ever prosecuted for non-denunciation bar one, Pierre Pican, who is today bishop emeritus of BayeuxLisieux, and who was in 2001 handed a three-year suspended prison sentence for “non-denunciation of sexual assault”.


Of the 25 bishops involved in hiding the cases, five are still active. They are Philippe Barbarin, cardinal and archbishop of Lyon; archbishop of Besançon JeanLuc Bouilleret; the bishop of Bayonne, Marc Aillet; the bishop of Le Mans, Yves Le Saux, and Bernard Fellay, a bishop who heads the Catholic traditionalist Society of Saint-Pius X.


Since he was appointed archbishop of Lyon in 2002, Barbarin was made aware of sexual abuse allegations against five priests, but took no steps to alert the judicial authorities. Evidence of the abuse was provided by families, in detailed correspondence, and in some cases by the confessions of the priests themselves. Despite Barbarin’s inaction, two of the priests were subsequently prosecuted and convicted, two have been placed under investigation while the results of a canonical enquiry into the case of the fifth have been passed on to the justice authorities.
Jean-Luc Bouilleret, now archbishop of Besançon, was head of the diocese of Amiens in northern France when, during the mid-2000s, he was informed, by three priests and the family of the alleged victim, of a case of sexual assault by priest Stéphane Gotoghian. “In the course of my ministry in Amiens, I held a meeting with a family who told me this: ‘something happened between our son and such-andsuch a priest’”, Bouilleret told Mediapart. The related incident was sufficiently serious for Bouilleret to urge the family to lodge a formal complaint with the authorities, but which they did not do.

Bouilleret said that he sought the advice of the Amiens public prosecutor, and “orally indicated every element” he was aware of to the prosecutor’s office. He gave no written account of the allegations, nor did he launch an internal enquiry.


The public prosecutor’s office took no action, apparently for lack of evidence. Meanwhile, Father Gotoghian escaped a suspension from his duties, although he was barred from activities with teenage children. In 2014, he was convicted of five sexual assaults of underage boys between 2002 and 2012, and sentenced to three years in prison (18 months suspended).


In Bayonne, south-west France, a priest who was the subject of several allegations of sexual crimes was protected by the Church for more than 25 years. As Directeur de la publication : Edwy Plenel http://www.mediapart.fr 3 3/5 of his appointment as bishop of Bayonne in 2009, Marc Aillet was made aware of the accusations of paedophile acts by Father Jean-Francois Sarramagnan, both by the family of one of his alleged victims and in a confession from the priest himself. The bishop only alerted the justice authorities seven years later, in 2016, when a flood of revelations of paedophile cases involving the French Catholic Church was reported in the media.


In Le Mans, north-west France, Bishop Yves Le Saux received a letter in 2010 from the family of an alleged victim of sexual abuse committed by priest Max de Guibert, who Le Saux allowed to continue to work with groups of minors. “I only knew of the case as of my arrival,” Le Saux told Mediapart in an interview last November. “Already, before me, he was removed from his ministry.” Le Saux said the family who wrote to him had not wanted to lodge a formal complaint with the authorities.


It was not until 2015 that the priest was formally placed under investigation by the justice authorities on suspicion of committing rape and sexual assaults against minors between 1993 and 2007, which he has denied. Our investigation has also learnt that Bernard Fellay, the bishop who heads the Catholic traditionalist Society of Saint-Pius X, was informed of allegations of sexual abuse committed by two of the fraternity’s priests, but never alerted the authorities to the fact. One of the cases involved Father Philippe Peignot, who remained in contact with youngsters for many years, notably scouts. The other case involved Father Christophe Roisnel who, after the sexual abuse allegations emerged, was transferred to a monastery in Burgundy. In 2014, he was formally placed under investigation by the justice authorities for rape, torture and barbarous acts against adult victims.


This investigation has found compelling evidence that, beginning in the 1960s, at least 339 people were the victims of confirmed or alleged sexual abuse by priests and other representatives of the French Catholic Church, and 288 of the victims were aged under 15 at the time of the events. The cases of just 165 victims led to a judicial investigation after preliminary enquiries by the police. Most of the other cases were dismissed on the grounds of the statute of limitations.


Regarding the perpetrators of the crimes covered up by the Church, the most shocking cases in terms of the number of victims of any one individual were that of Father Bernard Preynat in Lyon, south-east France, (72 alleged victims) and Father Pierre-Étienne Albert in Rodez, south-west France, (58 alleged victims).


The victims identified in our investigation include those who were adults at the time of the events. The denunciation of sexual abuse of adults is required by French law only in particular circumstances. But in several cases of abuse against adults, our investigation has found clear evidence of negligence on the part of the Church, notably when the vulnerable victims were reluctant to lodge a formal complaint with the authorities against the perpetrator, such as in the case of priest Tony Anatrella in Paris, or when the victim informed only representatives of the Church, as in the case of Father Philippe de Morand in Lyon. In that latter example, the father of the priest’s victim had alerted Philippe Barbarin, cardinal and archbishop of Lyon, about the events.


Contrary to regular claims by the French Catholic Church that the cases of sexual abuse date from decades past, half of those cited in this investigation, and who were given protection by the Church, committed their crimes, alleged or confirmed, after the year 2000.


These include the case of priest Michel Chidaine, who was sentenced in January 2017 by a court in Clermant-Ferrand, central France, to five years in prison, three suspended, for paedophile crimes committed between 2008 and 2010 while on mission in the Central African Republic. Another is the case of Stéphane Gotoghian, a priest sentenced in 2014 to three years in prison, 18 months suspended, for five sexual assaults of minors in Amiens, northern France, between 2002 and 2012. Before these cases came to trial, three archbishops – Hippolyte Simon, archbishop emeritus of Clermant-Ferrand, Jacques Noyer, archbishop emeritus of Amiens, and Jean-Luc Directeur de la publication : Edwy Plenel http://www.mediapart.fr 4 4/5 Bouilleret, formerly archbishop of Amiens and now archbishop of Besançon – were separately informed of the priests’ crimes but took no action.


Of the 32 identified here as accused of sexual abuse, 28 were transferred to other geographical locations after their immediate hierarchy – bishops and others – were made aware of the accusations against them, but failed to alert the police or justice authorities to the situation.


The mode of operation varies little from one diocese to another; as soon as the first complaints emerge, the priest suspected of sexual abuse is given “sabbatical leave”, and then posted to another region, more often in a rural area, or another diocese.
Among those transferred from urban to rural areas within the same diocese is priest Bernard Preynat, who was moved from a suburb in the city of Lyon to the region surrounding the town of Roanne in central France. Among those moved from one diocese to another is priest Jean Bréheret, who was transferred from the town of Angers, in north-west France, to Saint-Flour, a small commune about 500 kilometres away in the Cantal region of central France.
There were also the cases of accuses priests who were sent to work abroad, or conversely who were brought back to France from the overseas missions where the alleged offences took place, such as priest Régis Peillon who was brought back to France from Ivory Coast where, according to his own confession, he sexually abused several minors. Last year he was given a one-year suspended jail sentence for sexually abusing a minor and an adult following his return to France in 2008.


This investigation charts other similar cases (see graphic above) of transfers abroad, and from abroad, of clerics suspected of sexual crimes. These include: a priest transferred from Guinea-Conakry, a former French colony in West Africa where he allegedly committed rape and other sexual offences on minors, to the Sacré-Cœur community in central France; a Lyon priest sent on missionary work in Africa; an oblate moved from Belgium to Lourdes in southwest France; a monk transferred from central France to Romania and a priest moved from Tours in west-central France to Bologna in Italy. By moving the clerics from one country to another, they were distanced from the potential judicial consequences of their acts, and even also, in certain cases, from problems with the higher ecclesiastic authorities.


In the dioceses, the task is not as easy as it is for the more autonomous religious communities and missionary orders. “The advantage of the communities is that they have access to international networks, to places in Africa or in Asia, which allows them to recycle clerics,” said Dutch theologian and journalist Hendro Munsterman.



123 replies on “TODAYS BLOG ON FRENCH SCANDAL SUBMITTED BY BLOG COMMENTATOR.”

”God, you are my God, and I will trust in you and not be shaken. Lord, of peace renew, a steadfast spirit within me, to rest, in you alone”

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Two things:
Interesting the note that rape is a crime. Doh.
The last line refers to the moving about of abusive priests which you posted on the other day, and indicates it is easier for religious than secular.

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They are scum, Bp Pat, and to think you could still be part of that organisation. What a sobering thought that must be.

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+ Vinnie and his egregiously useless co-bishops still have not closed RC Churches, as has pretty much every other religious body. Why not ? What arrogance to think that they do not have to follow the guidance of the State. It’s another example of their belief that they are above everybody and everything, because they are Church, which we see in today’s subject and in the clerical abuse scandal and coverup. Report a priest for a crime ?……Us ?….Oh, no, we are above that and are not bound by the usual rules of the world and life. They have arrogant exceptionalism written through them like a stick of rock…..

And, remind me, what was it that Jesus said about the arrogant clergy of his time…..?

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Those England and Wales bishops are focusing on the Rededication of England as Mary’s Dowry. Talk about transference….. Classic !

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Same old. Pat there is only so much you can say on abuse that you run out of things to comment about in the end. I think others are trying to indicate that we have exhausted all we are going to say about it.

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9:45 & 10:19
Nonsense.
Illusionary delusional wishful thinking. We have not exhausted all we are going to say. Not by a long shot.

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10.19: But….we can’t deny the haters, led by Mags the Rotten to be denied their daily vomiting of caca. Hopefully they – haters – will be touched by the amazing community spirit in our parishes, all inspired by the gospel of Christ. The prose of daily poison does become tedious and boring because these spouters have nothing worthwhile to offer from behind their keyboards and lace curtains.

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9:45
Sexual abuse of children hasn’t gone away .
Did you even read today’s article. Is covering up still going on in Britain and Ireland?
When are you guys going to take the issue seriously by challenging your superiors as a collective demanding reform? Why hasn’t that happened? Why?

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10.57am I don’t have any superiors so I don’t know what you are insinuating. What else can we say about abuse that hasn’t already been said – did you only read my earlier comment only in the way you wished to read it. If you can find new words then do enlighten us. It’s people like you picking fault at the slightest thing is why this world is in the state it’s in.

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12.51
I love that… ‘Mags the Rotten’. It’s one of my better titles. 😀 Others are:
Mags the Hater
Mags the Hate-Inciter
Mags the Lunatic
Mags the Crazy
Mags the Rag

I could go on, but I’d just be boasting. 🤣

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I certainly will consider. I am meeting one our main people today who is very IT savvy and will put it to them.

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I doubt that very much. But it would allow whoever wanted to “be present” at a Mass celebrated by a radical independent priest who, as well as offering Mass, would give a very short reflection???

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10.32: Pat, surprised you don’t have a webcam. Do you have a proper website? Catholic parishes are way, way ahead of you….

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My website is being removed but available on bishoppatbuckley.org

In the light of Coronavirus I am exploring a webcam for The Oratory.

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Even just Youtube Live is easy to do if you have a Youtube account. Just point your laptop camera you way.

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11:59
Do you have a bishop?
It’s due to people like you the Rcc is in a mess and a half.
Whether you are a cleric or lay person apologists like you enable the continuation of CSA.

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9.45: I agree with you about the repeat exhaustive commentary re: church abuse scandal. This is not to minimise in any way the horrendous and destructive nature of abuse. This is not to ask for censoring of opinion. What we get on this blog is an outpouring of vicious, nasty narratives. I have yet to read constructive comnemtary about how we adapt to a process of TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION whereby all relevant people, if possible, can gather to lay out in a fully, honest and transparent way all the abuses, the responses/non responses, the pain, the crimes, agencies involved – Church and State, Judiciary, Health professionals – and finally find a way that brings healing and justice. If prosecution of anyone is required, which undoubtedly there will be, that too must be addressed. We can never forget the inglorious chapters of our abuse scandals of church and state. Never. So, may I suggest that we begin on this blog by attempting a narrative whereby we are creative, imaginative and positive beyond name calling, mockery and ridicule. Having experienced abuse by a neighbour as a teenager, I want, as a priest, to find greater healing and try to be reconciled with my past, which is more often stymied by much horrible and nasty commentary I read here and elsewhere. I try to be positive. I’ve gone through the anger, pain, redentmemt, the rage, therapy. I am now mire at peace and with a support group I am better resourced to live my life with inner peace. The journey is easier when we receive and are embraced by kind, compassionate and hope-filled words and being surrounded by caring, positive people. Many people are justifiably angry at the Church but the streams of vitriol do not help victims/survivors.

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11:11am
You’d be surprised,+Pat.
The Popes live stream is only getting about 1000 to 1200 hits while live.
That’s with Italy on total lockdown.

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10.36

‘Truth and reconciliation’, priest?

Are you sure you want truth? Because most of it concerning Romanist priests is not flattering. Particulary the truth that the ‘good’ priests almost constantly harped on here kept their self-important heads low while the abuse sludge in the Church rose ever higher.

Why didn’t you, and your fellow priests, openly and publicly and collectively, protest especially the behaviour of your bishops? Why didn’t you protest in this way the behaviour of the Bishop of Rome, exceedingly slow to introduce the reforms he promised?

Why didn’t you protest the obscene expenditure of men like Noel Treanor?

Why did you promise or vow your loyalty to a bishop, not to Christ?

If you want reconciliation, priest, you, and your colleagues, are going to have to take ownership of some very uncomfortable truths about yourselves. So far on this blog, when these truths and questions are raised, priests go into aggressive denial, or worse, attempt to defend their self-serving conduct.

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To the ‘very many’ good priests I’m repeatedly told, and assured, exist in Ireland…
Hey guys! Do you feel pride swelling in your hearts for Jesus to know that you belong to, and are a representative of, an institution so morally rotten that it can, without a murmur of conscience, aid and abet rapists, child molesters, and all the seedy and criminal rest? Does it make you feel proud?
Be under no illusion, you cowardly lying parasites, THIS is what you stand for. Not for Christ. Not for goodness or love. But for… this.
I hope giving your lives through that evil ordination vow or promise was worth the effort.

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Stripping out the gratuitous insults, MC, you do still make a good substantive point about priests who are implicitly supporting an institution that has been shown at its core to be duplicitous, lying, and sinful. That includes its priest and bishops. I would really like to see some brave clergy stand up and say that they have had enough of this wickedness and that they are calling it out, and then putting some flesh on it by their actions – perhaps refusing to continue in its employ, finding other ways to minister, even if it does mean something of a personal struggle for them financially and materially. I am sure that if some of them took that brave step, they would be supported, and even if it difficult for them they would not be completely abandoned. But will be see this ? Is it too much of an ask of a group who are well cosseted, comfortable and disinclined to jeopardise their own security ? Mind you, these are the men who preach to us about self-sacrifice, martyrdom, paying the price of the gospel……

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The insults are not gratuitous, they are merely what anyone who lives in reality would expect for this behaviour.

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10.57: Why repeat Magna hate speech? Are you too cocooned from the world? Or are you just another hate inciter? There are, regrettably forvyour, many, many.good priests. You know this to be true. The presence of corruption and revelations of abuse make me more determind to live the gospel of Christ and to do my utmost for people. Your hatred doesn’t deter me in the slightest nor make me rethink priesthood. I rethink it every day since my ordination, almost 42 years ago. Perhaps you might outline a blueprint for a renewed Christ-like Church, that’s if you’re interested or really care, which I doubt and in a way that’s free of vitriol, untruths and cynicism.

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Pat, for how long are you going to allow the lunatic hiding behind “Magna Carta” to spew this vitriol? The hatred and lies of this individual are not normal. His false characterisations of priests are utterly appalling. Despite your own experiences, you must surely KNOW that these wicked blanket attacks on the character and integrity of the entire priesthood is untrue and deeply unjust. What this individual is at is demonic in its venom and its insane hate.

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10 45: HATE SPEECH AT ITS UGLIEST. Pat, you obviously support these views of Magna as you print similar each day. The invective is the same. But, thank God our parishioners are very loyal, caring and supportive and we in turn, GOOD PRIESTS, stand with and accompany God’s people, the people who we are called to care for. These days we ARE TOTALLY AVAILABLE to be with people, unafraid to be with them. Magna, your world is dark, macabre, a dangerous place and a world that is so disconnected from NORMAL HUMANITY that you can’t even find yourself!! God help you.

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MC you are never going to integrate your own sinful history into drive to become whole if you think that you are dealing with it by your outpourings here. You will drive yourself into an early grave if you don’t reach out for professional help. It’s there for the asking.

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Let’s do a tally here of good priests, as best we may.
Now I’ve already declared that there are ‘very many’ good priests. Another poster (probably one of these good priests) has declared that there are ‘many many’ good priests, while a third poster (again probably one of these good priests) has declared, too, that there are simply ‘GOOD PRIESTS’.
Now Mathematics is my forte (I read the statistical variety at university), so I’ll do some simple addition, of good priests:
Very many + many many + GOOD PRIESTS =
ZERO 🤔
My goodness! 😱
I have discovered an entirely new mathematical conundrum that will have logicians (and know-all Barney down the pub) scratching the dandruff off their scalps at that one.
I have just proved that the sum of invariable parts can be absolutely and conclusively… sod-all. 😀

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12.41

The poster at 10.57 made a very good point (about priests leaving the instiutional Church to minister independently) and you, predictably for a priest, ducked it.

If the presence of corruption and abuse in the Church make you more determined to live ‘the gospel of Christ’, then why are you continuing to support, through your ministry, an institution you have admitted is corrupt and abusive? Can you explain this to me…logically? It’s like remaining a member of an extremist group, e.g. ISIS, knowing what it really is yet nevertheless proclaiming yourself determined to go on doing good. It’s a contradiction in terms which, were it not so seriously misplaced, would be side-splittingly hilarious.

So forget about throwing accusations at people that they are haters, or hate-inciters, or purveyors of vitriol, or whatever. These are childish attempts by you and others to avoid uncomfortable questions about yourselves, principally: How can you continue to shore up, publicly, an institution you know is morally rotten while similtaneously claiming that you are ‘living the gospel of Christ’?

Surely, even a priest can do better than that.😕

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10:36
All grand and dandy.
I was lied to recently by my bishop. I don’t think we are there yet.
Put your idea to the powers that be in the church. I don’t think they’d care enough to even consider it.
Remember some posters to this blog endure and endured spiritual abuse as well as the other consequences of abusiveness. Some are prematurely in their graves.

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11.18: Hi dopehead, queenie troll. The referencing to Fr. O’ Carroll in jeering, feminine nouns is a reflection on your absolute immaturity, gombeenism and stunted human growth. Probably a rejected seminarian or a disgruntled “didn’t get promotion” jealous type. Grow up.

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“Perhaps what is already happening in the French Catholic Church is an indication of where Irish Catholicism is headed, writes David Rice.
IT HAS often been said that France has her crises before the rest of Europe – whether it be the French Revolution itself, or the student revolt of 1968, or the alienation of people from the churches.
There is one such crisis where France is ahead of Ireland, and that is in its shortage of Roman Catholic priests. France is also ahead in its response to that shortage. In essence the lay people have taken over the local church and run it for themselves.
In one diocese in northern France there is only one priest to serve 27 parishes. It means the priest has been reduced to the role of circuit rider who drops by on rare occasions to offer a Mass and consecrate some hosts. For the rest of the time the people run their church themselves. In 2001 the diocese of Nice had to reduce its 265 parishes down to 47.
One of these, the recently created parish of Nôtre Dame de l’Espérance, runs along a celebrated strip of the Mediterranean coast, with five churches. There were five priests; now there is just one, who cannot cope on his own. Yet all five village churches are flourishing.
The secret is that each church has an appointed lay person, called a relais local, whose duty is to run both church and parish, and perform almost all functions save uttering the words of consecration and administering those sacraments only a priest is allowed to do.
A principal function of the relaisis to conduct a Sunday Communion service in the absence of the priest – for all practical purposes a Mass without the consecration. There is frequently no priest at a funeral any more.
At the Église Sacré Coeur in Beaulieu, I attended one such funeral, conducted by the relais localefor the church. She received the coffin. There were words of welcome, the singing of hymns, a short eulogy of the deceased, readings from scripture, a brief reflection by the relais, the lighting of candles beside the coffin, a blessing of the coffin with holy water, and prayers for the deceased. It lasted about half-an-hour. There was no Mass, as there was no priest. But there wasn’t a Communion service either.
This new de facto structure in the parish is not confined to relais locales. Marie-Anne Hosley, an energetic Frenchwoman whose mother hails from Co Down, has lately been appointed general manager of the parish with its five churches. While her official title is économe, she assures me it is more about admin than money.
Although unpaid herself, she manages a payroll of nine people, including cleaners, organists and two parish secretaries.
Other lay people – men and women – are equally active in many of the former roles of the priest – parish visitation, counselling, pre-marriage instruction, attending the sick, bringing communion, chaplaincies to hospitals and retirement homes and in some areas to scout and youth groups.
Also it is lay people who, almost exclusively, perform the crucial role of imparting their faith.In the neighbouring diocese of Monaco, Bernadette Keraudren gives many hours guiding catechumens – those who want to become Christian or Catholic.
The catechumens go through about two years of guidance, all done by lay people. None of this is stop-gap until better times come. This is for keeps, because better times are not coming. Soon there won’t be any priests at all. Or so few that it simply won’t count. So people here see a totally new church ministry evolving, which will inevitably become more formalised.
But the dearth of priests means that the people will ultimately be left without the sacraments and without the Eucharist, the centre of their faith. That is why the relais, and all these other layfolk who are de facto running the church, are asking, when will the Vatican wake up to the facts of life and allow or recognise new ministries?
“Vatican Two talked about us all being priests,” Hosley says. “The priesthood of the laity. So maybe the church will soon have a new form of priest.” That could mean that, in one fell swoop, there would be women priests and married priests. Many here believe that time is not far off.
• David Rice, a former Dominican priest, is the author of six books “

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It’s all new to me. I am taking advice. Isolated people might like various kinds of spiritual resources?

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12:19pm
According to Fr. Tom Doyle, .000064 percent of Catholics, i.e. the clergy and hierarchy, lead over 1 billion Catholics.

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For God’s sake…..they have time to announce two new auxiliary bishops (in Birmingham), but they can’t find time to tell us what is happening this weekend with Masses in England and Wales. What a useless lot. Fiddling while Rome burns. The Scottish bishops have closed churches. As has pretty much everybody else. But, all we get are saccharine statements about being so unworthy to be chosen by the Holy Father, and how surprised they are at their episcopal appointment, and how they obediently have accepted. But, as to the pressing matter of the moment – not a dickie bird.

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I many places in France now the churches are not used where lay people are still not allowed to do things ..Sometimes Mass only once a year as the only service .The church does this oncea year mass rather than hand the church over to the French State , and to stop it becoming available to other denominations to use .

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Well you won’t be getting permission from anybody anytime soon in France. I hope you enlightened the Mayor that you were excommunicated.

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The Mayor was fully informed of my history, was delighted to meet he and attended the wedding Mass during which the couple were married and their two babies baptised.

The next say the mayor have a small reception in.my honour at l’ hôtel de ville.

Also in the last two years 3 Roman Catholic PP’s have let me use the parish church for my weddings.

The things you dont know about 😆

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you are pure evil, Pat. I’m genuinely convinced of that now. God have mercy on your soul and all our souls.

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No I am not. As the French Peguay said: “I am a sinner, but a good sinner”. 😇

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Pat you could set a lap top up in the oratory , and broadcast through facebook .Either do it on a private facebook page , or set up a page for the Oratory Society .

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MC Hammered 18th Mar 2020 — 2:15 pm — 1:41pm – Does God recognise excommunications?
………………………………..
That assertion that if the Pope were to excommunicate someone dead and in Heaven God would have to switch him to Hell was dropped from Denzinger’s Enchiridion around sixty years ago.
But it’s never been publicly dropped from RCC teaching. The Pope claims to rule over all Catholics – in Heaven, on Earth and in Purgatory. Hence the symbol of the Papacy remains the Triple Tiara.

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I am neither. I am a sinner whose heart is in the right place. In God’s name I expose and condemn all the corruption and abuse in a church I once believed to be of God.

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no need to shout at me. I wasn’t expecting you to broadcast a lap dance! it might be a good idea to show the inside of the oratory.

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its only a shed. the state of it outside. I know a traveler family who went there once, they said the paving was all cracked, looked rough outside, and you ‘wouldn’t swing a cat in it’. and he charges for these facilities.

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Bishop Pat, couldn’t a private Mass be celebrated in your sitting room.
Full lockdown is very likely. Life won’t get back to normal for months.

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Yes of course. But my oratory is next to my house. I like the idea of Mass from there – with just me.

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RC Church in England & Wales has just stated all Masses will be celebrated without congregation. Restrictions on all Sacraments in line with Ireland including ordinations which include ordination of Bishops.

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“Due to the necessary restrictions on travel and social interactions announced by the UK government on Monday 16th March, we announce that the Episcopal Ordination of Bishop Elect David Oakley as a public event on Thursday 19th March will not take place. Bishop Elect David will be ordained in a liturgy without congregation that will be streamed live from our Cathedral in Northampton.
Everyone is invited to join us for a ‘virtual ordination‘ by following the celebration via the live stream at 11.00am on Thursday which can be viewed here. “

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Re Magna Speak
If MC’s comments were aimed at Rabbis and Imams this website would be closed down for dissemintating Hate Speech. Whats going on in the world inhabitated by Bucklistas?

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I’m delighted to read of a return to tradition vis a vis consecration. I rather like to picture the younger Cardinal Antonio Barberini’s consecration as a small family like affair rather than an extravaganza.
Alas, it took a long time for the oils to affect his life, but that may explain so many erratic clergy whose lineage is derived from his, by hook or by crook, as it were, in the ecclesiastical underworld.
I wonder if Peter Anson ever took this into consideration.

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2:18 pm & 5:21pm

Here’s another comparsion;
What do you think would happen if lay citizens knowingly covered up child rape or protected child rapists?

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Yes, it’s often sung at easter. I think Good Friday? has a hunting melody to it. I can’t seem to find the name of the song 😦

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5.15: Magna, of course it sounds like an IRISH Easter Hymn….very intelligent of you. It certainly isn’t Latin, French or German….

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No shortage of recklessness on the part of magna carta who opines in relation to a two word clue and identifies a hymn which doesn’t contain the other word.
Pontificates on a theory when he gets an idea and never bothers to check whether he’s right.
Hence the usual diatribe.

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8.08

You’re still smarting, aren’t you? Can’t move on from all the drubbings I’ve given you on this blog?😅

Well, here’s a thought that didn’t enter your little mind, since it is too big a thought for that mind to contain:

THE OTHER POSTER MAY HAVE MISTAKENLY INCLUDED THE WORD ‘ALLELUIA’. (Duh!😅)

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So you even know better than the person who sent out the request.

And so, a hymn with the one-word clue, the name of Jesus, and you have it.

The same rigour lies behind your incursions into an array of subjects.

Maybe one of your, currently, two doctorates is in musicology, specialising in hymns which contain the word Íosa! Or, perhaps this will be the area of your third doctorate.

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Thank you all. Magna I saw that hymn earlier, it’s a beautiful one. I may even use it at some point.
@7:13, that’s the song. thanks a mill !

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8:23 & 8:31pm

They might grow to love you, MC. 😅 There’s another challenge!😜 It’s not against their religion, is it?😇🙏

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8.37

I think they secretly do, MC. Particularly the poster at 8.08.

I’ve grown inordinately fond of him/her, and have even given the person a pet-name, ‘My Stalker’🐶

It’s all, of course, in the best-possible taste. 😎

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8:53

MC, 8:08 is in luv!. He/she, just doesn’t know it. 💜
Your stalker is only a little puppy, a poodle. 🐩Wait for the woof! 🐶
Mumsy has gone dumsy, today. 😷 And, the gals are gone to ground. 💄
Of course, it’s all said, in the best-selling possible taste.😎

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The Pope has appealed for Catholics around the world to participate in the 24 Hours for the Lord initiative.
Posted on Vatican news website this afternoon.

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I’m confused. My Church in Glasgow is open for visits and to light a candle, but if I happen to do that at 10am as the Priest is saying private Mass, I get chucked out, and told to come back later and can have face to face confessions and drop my covenant envelope designed for Mass in his safe.

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I bet Father in Glasgow wishes it were !
But, just you watch. The clergy will be very keen to ensure that the offering envelopes will keep coming in. There will be all sort of initiatives to “invite’ the faithful to keep supporting the parish. And the priest. And his extra curricular activities. They will find a way and the words. Plus ca change plus chest la meme chose. Coronavirus ain’t going to mean an drop in standards and lifestyle for Father, I assure you !

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Keep your next contribution and and buy yourself an elementary French grammar. (This may require multiple donations.)

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