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CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND THEIR ADDICTIONS.

The Relational Roots of Addiction

The fractured person soothes or stimulate himself to feel “whole”

Kristi Pikiewicz Ph.D. Psychology Today

Addiction provides temporary relief — emotional regulation that was otherwise unavailable. It can make the addicted person feel temporarily “regular”.

The first “regulator” in any person’s life is their caretaker(s), who contains or modifies the baby’s anxiety or distress by providing emotional safety as well as comfort, soothing, joy and other essential psychological experiences.  Mother and child constitute what we might call a “system,” meaning that you cannot look at one individual in isolation.  A crying baby who is neglected by his mother cannot be blamed for not “controlling himself.”  If this neglect is habitual, the child learns eventually that his feelings or needs within this system are “bad” because they are ignored or met with anger, irritation, etc. 

Ideally, the child is provided for within a caring environment, and learns that caretakers can be counted on to help when needed.  But what happens when the environment is neglectful, erratic, frightening or otherwise injurious (overtly or covertly)?  In this case the system is experienced by the child as rigid, abandoning, chaotic and/or punishing.  This is the genesis of toxic shame and an unshakeable inner “badness.”  Such a child learns that she is on her own, and that others cannot tolerate dimensions of her very existence; her desires, needs and wants have to be amputated, tucked away somewhere hidden. 

This traumatic separation from essential desires for connection results in depression, anxiety, isolation and/or physical symptoms such as headaches, disturbances in appetite, sleep or other somaticizations. 

To add insult to injury, the child is often rebuked or punished for “complaining” or “making trouble” by drawing attention to his or her pain and despair.  Such pain is dismissed, minimized or ignored.  Thus to even acknowledge the pain of the abandonment or injury is “wrong,” since it rocks the boat, draws the risk of being exiled, perhaps forever. 

Such terror makes an imprint on the nervous system that is hard to change; a traumatized child must develop maladaptive behaviors and beliefs to survive this dark and chaotic world, to avoid “burdening” those close to her with her very human developmental needs.  Best if these needs just go away and never come back. 

Of course, they don’t.  They can’t; they are an inseparable part of us, even if represent a threat to one’s primary relationships.  They demand soothing, and will find it, even unconsciously, via drugs or alcohol.

Thus drinking or using becomes a “provisional” relationship to fill in the psychic cavities left by these early traumas.  The fractured, wounded person is able to satiate, soothe or stimulate himself to the point of finally feeling whole!  This is the euphoria reported by those who learn to love booze or drugs, which become so much more reliable than anyone or anything else before.  Finally, one is able to regulate and not feel so out of control, fractured or wounded. 

This is why I find it crucially important to understand the regulating function provided, however fleetingly, by drugs or alcohol.  Very often an addicted patient knows that what he is doing is destructive; at the same time, drinking or using is the only thing that has worked.  Behind the machine-like compulsion is an unconscious set of wishes and hopes that are not and have neverbeen safe to express.  If a patient senses he will be giving up his only effective means of regulating feelings and states of mind, with no known substitute in sight; if he thinks that sobriety will require yet another amputation of his most tender yearnings and wishes, he will be highly reluctant to give up his most historically reliable friend.  Without a replacement for the provisional functions of that relationship, motivation for therapy fades.  I try to provide an environment within which at least some of those needs can be met, in order for therapy to proceed in a way that, despite the rough patches, ultimately feels vitalizing for the patient. 

Consider Stan, a 22 year old undergrad who binged chronically on pot.  At first I encouraged him to attend Marijuana Anonymous (MA) meetings, considering his failing grades and shaky employment and housing status.

But he was adverse to MA and refused to go, telling me he preferred to try and quit on his own.  This to me sounded like egotism and machismo, so I gently but persistently kept encouraging him to try MA.  We got nowhere, even when he withdrew from school and began living in his car. 

Things finally shifted when I began to honor his choices and autonomy, anxious though it made me.  In other words I surrendered my agenda – which, I eventually realized, echoed that of his smothering, controlling mother, who had been nagging him for years to stop.  My tone and demeanor couldn’t have been more different, but it felt to Stan like a repetition of his experience with mom.  No wonder he wasn’t interested in the meetings!

I began to encourage his attempts to stop on his own, and over a few months he actually did.  This encouraged him to open up and trust me a bit more, a real challenge for him given his literal abandonment at a young age by a self-centered, narcissistic father. Stan was able to begin to meet his previously hidden needs for encouragement, guidance and parental approval within a trusting environment.

I found that marijuana was how he and his peers “bonded”; Stan had never had a stable group of friends growing up, given his mother’s wandering in search of stable work.  (I later learned she was an alcoholic.)   This brotherhood of guys loved him without demand or condition and was phenomenally important to his self-definition.

The more I understood the risks Stan was taking in trusting me, and his new girlfriend, Alice – and in being honest by asking both his mother to back off and his dad to be a part of his life – the more our work deepened, and the better his life got.  This was sometimes a rocky process, to be sure.  Still, his grades improved over time, and he had a mostly satisfying relationship with Alice, with whom he was honest and who appeared to respect his wishes, even though she scared him a bit with her own vulnerable yearnings for closeness.

Once I entered Stan’s experiential world without a hard-cast “agenda,” well-intentioned though it was, I began to better understand his agenda of defining himself in a collaborative way that felt neither intrusive nor abandoning.  (Note that such an agenda may be necessary if the person is in some kind of acute crisis.)  It reminds me again of the strange paradox that the more a patient and I accept drugs or alcohol as providing some kind of essential emotional/relational function, rather than being simply “wrong”, the easier it is to give up. 

The goal is to begin replacing the abuse/dependence on substances with actual human connections; my relationship with the patient serves as a model, a way of relating honestly and intimately, working through whatever conflicts inevitably arise, and building trust. 

The tragedy for so many of my addicted patients is not that they live in isolation and both yearn and fear closeness to others; it’s that they’ve come to the conviction that this is the only way to proceed.  My great hope is to become a catalyst in providing a different, sometimes uncomfortable but ultimately healing relational experience. 

PAT SAYS

I have met an awful lot of priests during my life.

Many of them had addictions.

Some were / are addicted to alcohol.

Others were / are addicted to gambling.

Many were / are addicted to sex in various expressions of it.

Others were / are addicted to power.

Others were / are addicted to money.

I wanted to think of the above article in relation to priests today  – but of course it’s not only about priests.

How much a role does compulsory celibacy play in priestly addictions?

I’m reminded of that poem

This Be The Verse

BY PHILIP LARKIN

They fuck you up, your mum and dad.   

    They may not mean to, but they do.   

They fill you with the faults they had

    And add some extra, just for you.

But they were fucked up in their turn

    By fools in old-style hats and coats,   

Who half the time were soppy-stern

    And half at one another’s throats.

Man hands on misery to man.

    It deepens like a coastal shelf.

Get out as early as you can,

    And don’t have any kids yourself.

To one extent or another we were all messed up by our “caretakers”.

Those of us who are First Borns probably suffered the most?

To address these matters in ourselves and others I think we need:

1. A healthy notion of God as the “caretaker” who will never mess us up or let us down.

2. The ability to develop healthy “regulators” in our lives –

Faith.

Prayer.

Experiencing human intimacy.

Posession of a sense of being needed and useful.

Sadly, many of these things have been lacking in priestly formation.

98 replies on “CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND THEIR ADDICTIONS.”

people are addicted to lots of things, alcohol, drugs, pornography. so long as it doesn’t hurt anyone then its their own business. obviously unless it actually harms anyone else or a drink problem turns into something illegal or otherwise

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It usually harms the common good when addictions make them unemployed or unemployable, familes break up, children of addicts get taken into care, people get into debt and become homeless, drugs pushers prosper, women and children are exploited by porn (whose “stars” commit suicide) crime and domestic violence increases and the NHS is burdened.
Apart from that, addiction’s great.

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Bishop Pat did you read my earlier (unpublished) comments and will you meditate on them and pray for me?
I am deadly serious in what I said.

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12:19am I hope you are alright. I had a crappy year or two owing to abuse I suffered, I was literally at my witts end, but +Pat is a man of God and he helped me on my journey of healing.
Please remain strong and remember you are not alone and things can be healed. Things do get better.
God bless x
Ps I am in mainland UK if I am needed in any way and I have a car and place to stay.

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Pat you can publish this
10:02
Thank you, you sound kind. I don’t know if things will get better. Every day is a nightmare. COVID-19 doesn’t help things.
I have no friends, I only have my mother now… my dad is dead and there isn’t a day I don’t miss him. Today being Father’s day is eating me up inside. It’s so painful, he was my best friend.
I too am on the mainland and have a car. At the moment I haven’t been driving much though. I go out for long walks every day and I try to pray as I walk. I wonder if God wants to listen to me anymore because I don’t hear him like I used to.

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1:02pm, thank you for sharing this.
I lost my nan around 5 years ago and I thought the world of her, she was a Saint. So I know what it’s like, you have your good days and your bad, and lockdown has given us lots of spare time.
I am glad you have reached out because this is a good thing. It wasn’t until I reached out that I realised things can get better.
If you would like to talk over phone or even visit Liverpool, or I would be happy to visit you, just let +Pat know a he can give you my details.
Ps walking and praying is something I love to do often.
I also have 2 cats and they have taken over the house, but I wouldn’t have it any other way now. They have been surprisingly good for the healing process.
God bless

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@4:56 My cat has become a big part of the healing process. She is currently asleep on my lap. She follows me everywhere.

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Of course, compulsory celibacy when it comes to the priesthood invariably means repressing homosexuality, which in turn has a tendency to manifest itself in other ways. Dressing up like Fr Littleton is a mild example. Still, falling out windows, chatting up youths on Grindr, or exposing yourself online show where it can lead up to. Fr Marsden may be another extreme example, or the +Aul Doll monstrating in public a couple of months ago.

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8.10: If you thought a little more intelligently and are serious about the wide spectrum of addictions and attendant behaviours, you’d not have made so flimsy and uneducated a comment, particularly your reference to “the auld doll monstrating”.. That immediately debased this serious issue. There are many reasons for addictive behaviours – sexual immaturity, lack of emotional development, impoverished childhood, poverty, social and cultural expectations (for men especoally), abuse of any kind, loneliness, a proliferation of pornography, easy availability of drugs and alcohol…For priests who display addictive behaviours of any kind, I believe that celibacy and our way of life – clericalism – and the absence of meaningful, intimate relationships are contributory factors. I know many, many wonderful priests who are solid in their human development and spirituality. The honesty, integrity and witness of their lives continues to inspire me, mostly of an older generation, but some younger. Addictive behaviours crosses all professions and individuals. Take a visit to Sr. Consilio’s Cuan Mhuire Centres and you will have quite an awakening….

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Some people are addicted to their own dignity. If you were more experienced in the effects of trauma you would recognise the comment for what it is.

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I think we all recognise that there is some grave dysfunction at the heart of priesthood as lived these days, and in the personal lives of many priests. The premise on which priesthood is based – namely exclusivity, specialness, being set apart, being anointed, unaccountable etc – along with the imposition of mandatory celibacy, as well as the paucity of proper personal, emotional, psycho-sexual and spiritual development as delivered by our seminaries, pretty much ensures that most priests are hobbled by immaturity and dysfunction to such a degree that it is almost inevitable that throughout their lives they will exhibit strange behaviours and patterns of life. This includes all of the manifestations and behaviours that + Pat has outlined above, and many more.
We see the headlines each and every day – the cast of characters that have appeared on this blog, such people as Rory, Gorgeous, JPL, Jolly, Littleton just to name a few. As well we see their so called ‘leaders’ – the likes of Bling Bishops like + Treanor of D & G, ineffectual and limited characters like + Martin of Armagh, and bishops who simply enjoy the exercise of power and authority in order to advance their own ambitions, like + Nichols of Westminster. And many more who have shown themselves unworthy to be leaders in the faith.
We have become used to the gaping inadequacies and egregious dysfunction of our priests and bishops, and nothing seems to surprise us anymore. Most of us take what we can from our faith, and try to ignore the noises off, and to limit the influence of these people on us. We actually don’t listen to them anymore, so Littleton and his ilk can squeak on about all kinds of esoteric theological nonsense, and we simply do not listen because we know that we can find our own way. I do still wonder why we tolerate them and support them. Perhaps out of a sense of historical loyalty ?
It cannot be much fun for priests and bishops. Their lifestyle and the way that they have lived it for so long is now seen by pretty much everybody as unsustainable, as well as being seen as the source of so much pain and suffering for them personally but also as it has been inflicted on the Church and in particular the most vulnerable. So, perhaps the time has come for us to be less indulgent of our clergy and bishops, and for us to call them out as well as to begin to look to significant changes that are required in order to make the priesthood and leadership in the Church healthy and life-giving rather than as source of dysfunction, lack of integrity, abuse and coverup. The time has come , surely ?

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I am afraid you are right @9:06. I think that what has replaced the culture of blokish camaraderie in the days when seminaries were full – not that they were not without problems either – is an unhealthy hot-house atmosphere of being special accompanied by the exclusive outward trappings of clericalised identity. This might be comparable to addiction, since it conceals and compensates for inadequacy, and authentic personal growth and integrity.
You only have to look around you. In my view too there is little evidence of reform and meaningful recovery.

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Tiny seminaries are hothouses and have formation staff with too much time on their hands who wreak havoc on their too few subjects.
The type of person who enters seminaries has narrowed too. Not just that 99% are gay, but especially in England they are middle-class and somewhat fey, or overweight boys who had been bullied in school, or had trouble getting a girlfriend, or late vocations of unmarried men (why unmarried?) fancying a career change, or social justice/Cafod activists, or very pious men schooled in a soppy, feminised Divine Mercy/Youth 2000 spirituality.
In short, a community of men who are highly untypical of their peers in church or secular life.

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I think it a bit unfair to keep including MJB in this list of disasters. He is rather an example of someone who has successfully turned his life around and is now doing valued, worthwhile and appreciated work in the community. I’d say, good for you Michael, and have a great life.

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10 59: I agree with you. Continuing a narrative abiut MB is very sinful. If Pat truly believes that every sinner has a future, then he should desist the opportunities to weave MB into every category of priestly failings. It is harrassment and very selfish to facilitate any firm of on-going bullying, for that is what it truly is…Pat, has future as a sinner unfolded yet??

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I dont know if you noticed that recently, I, have not been weaving MJB into narratives. There is a reason for that.

Others continue to mention him.

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Yes, I think you have a point about MJB. He seems to have moved on, although I am still a bit confused about whether he has been laicised or is still a deacon ? If he is still in the clerical state, then he will still be subject to celibacy requirements. Maybe the best thing for him is to become laicised then he is pretty much free to do what he wants. Although, maybe there is still a plan to ordain him priest ? Whatever, I wish him the best, and have a sneaking admiration at how he has regained some integrity in his new life and work / ministry. Others could take a lesson from his book.

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Pat for god sake show some level of respect and refrain from speaking about the Archbishop of Armagh as “+ Aul Doll”. Offensive and totally disgusting.

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Is the Irish College in Rome really not opening for the next academic year? What about new vocations and current seminarians ? I wonder will Coddle live there when he retires if he’s allowed retire. I see the King of Spain sent a message of thanks to the Church in Spain. 100 priests died there from the kung flu.

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11.09: We’ve moved on from Irish College and Seminarians, the few that there are!! What are you really looking for? Could it be some fantastical sleaze story for your personal, sexual pleasure….get a grip.

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@11:15 – your mind is sick not mine. I’m wondering because I do hope to see more vocations – as I said Kung Flu has had an impact on the current levels of clergy. We need to ensure the Church continues to attract good people. Most priests in Dublin are nearly 70+ so of course I’d like to see new vocations or deacons to keep the Church alive.

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11.52 There has been many link and statements on Bishop Pat’s blog have you missed them if so look back.

No New seminarians 20/21 or 21/22

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11.52: I live in and with reality as a priest. Changes are happening – ones which are affecting the status, relevance and meaning of priesthood and church. Yes, we need good men and WOMEN to share their gifts, creativity, imagination and their Christ-like attributes to keep His memory alive and significant. True servants of the gospel can be found among all people who are open to the Holy Spirit. We are impoverished as a Christian community when we exclude everyone but “priestly” men!! Let’s try to re-envision what being a follower of Christ means and how we can make our communities more Christ-like. Surely the burdens of the complications of theology, tradition, spirituality and morality need to be overhauled? And quickly….

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I imagine if there were any new or increase in vocations, it would be widely reported by now. It seems even the fags are losing interest now their activities can be exposed by Bp Pat and ridiculed by commentators.

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12 31: Any supposed intelligent contribution you try to make is rendered superfluous and ignorant by your use of the offensive word – fags. A disgusting insult to all gay people. You are an idiot.

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Nobody realistically thinks that there will ever again be full-time Irish seminarians in the Irish College, Rome. The old buildings in Maynooth are to be turned into apartments, with a small modern seminary building replacing them. At this rate it will be a three bedroom bungalow.

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Even though addicts know that substance or behaviour of choice is harmful, they do it anyway because unmet needs and wants (for recognition, success, compansionship, joy, healed memories) are all distilled into the drug, alcohol, random sex etc. Addiction is a sign of pre-existing problems. Until they are fixed addiction is likely to carry on, and sadly after a while it makes problems much worse.

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8.02
I presume you mean the Polish city. You probably have done a lot to increase the tourist trade there when things return to normal.

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Priests need to back to the days when many of them were pioneers. Abuse of alcohol starts early, in Maynooth, and it’s easy to go down that slippery slope when living alone, in an empty house with long evenings and not much to do, and nobody, either a spouse, housekeeper or other priests to notice unhappiness or unhappy behaviour.

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12.17: Such nonsensical simplification of a deep illness- alcoholism – is utterly inane and stupid. It misses the true understanding of the nature of addictions and related behaviours. As if praying alone will help and solve all such priestly problems!!! Or anyone else in addictions if any kind….

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12.17pm Foolish argument Some priests who wear a poineer pin are actually drinkers anyhow. Don’t be fooled. The pioneers are an Irish thing and all a load of nonsense as is the Confirmation pledge. Lots of young people are drinking before they get near to Confirmation. It’s like the daft idea they had one time having a pub with no beer. I ask you.

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Pikiewicz’s article and comments so far fail to mention the chemical component of many addictions. The functional elements are evident and compulsive for many. The old psychiatric debate as to the origin and causal factors in mental illness is perhaps a parallel argument.
I don’t think it’s a clear cut ‘either-or’ scenario. I think there’s elements of both the functional and organic in many addictions, especially where the psychological and emotional “rewards” of an individual’s exploratory behaviour engenders compulsion of a chemical nature in the central nervous system.
We had a practising psychiatrist commenting on the blog some time ago. Perhaps you, or someone similarly qualified may care to comment. My lectures in psychiatry were 50 years ago!
MMM

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I wonder, MMM, did they talk about the experiment whereby rats were given access to plain water and to water laced with drugs? The rats went for the drug water ever time, to the point of overdose and death.
Then they supplemented the environment with nice food, mating partners, everything a rat might want. They still went for the drugs, byt much less so because other wants were well met.
Similarly, during the Vietnam war, drug use by US soldiers spiked. That caused moral panic, with the military and policymakers fearing a population of addicted veterans.
It didn’t happen because taken once taken out of hostilities, drug use dropped to the civilian average for their age. With stressors removed the need for stress relief was removed.
How many people self-medicate, I wonder?

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Bishop Pat seems to be leaving MJB alone and B.P. stated other week MJB was not in clerical state now.
The bloggers will not leave MJB alone and yet Bishop pat is suppose to stop this sort of attacks but now it is everyday Father Littleton and sadly they cannot get muck on him.
The obsessed of Father Little here is a thought for you where has Father Littleton been every day and night been since March.
No No not dressing up in lace or running around.
He has been at St. George’s hospital as part of the Chaplaincy team with the horrendous amount of people sadly dying due to Covid 19 and then at the crematorium or graveyard.
Thankfully Our Blessed Lady is protecting him from the obsessed bloggers or in fact stalker.
The Archdiocese still awaits communications from this idiot but no he gets his say on here attacking a young priest.
Lets be Christian and pray we do not get a second surge in Covid 19 as the Spanish Flu was worse second time around.

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My understanding is that MJB is still a deacon and still in the clerical state.

Not withstanding that, I believe he is doing good work as a lay chaplain at Lougjlinstown Hospital.

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+Pat loved the floor show today and your reference to Alcoholics Anonymous. I hope Magna was turned in too. Are you leaving the camera on 24/7 some parishes do that and it’s a good way to look at the blessed sacrament. You should email Roger Childs in RTÉ possibly do a Sunday broadcast from Larne ?

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Re the postings at 12:19 am and 10:02 am, I hope that you may at least have found it helpful to have shared on this blog. You should know that you are not alone. However, a lot of people feel isolated and disenfranchised, which Covid lockdown has made a lot worse. I certainly would not want to fob you off with any glib remedies, but, from my own experience of alcoholism, I can say that you cannot will the change, but you can be open to change, and when it is offered, take the opportunity and go for it. Life really can become so much better, and it is pure gift.
Having said that, there is a hard truth even in AA that not everyone will make it; and Aaron’s story from yesterday is one example of how it can be become just too much.
I hope you will pull through, and Pat can help you. Remember it’s not over until the fat lady sings! ( I have never really got what that means, but it got me through Monday morning horrors when I heard Rabbi Lionel Blue say it on Thought for the Day many years ago! ) God bless you.

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@1:54pm I wish I could believe that Pat could help me. I don’t think anybody can help me. Perhaps I would be better off out of this world. Once upon a time I did so much good. Now I’m useless. I have no friends. In a few years, it’s likely I won’t have any family either.
I gave my all to the Church and now it’s gone.

I pray that it will be Our Lady who sings as I enter into heaven, sooner rather than later.
There’s not a day that goes by when I don’t think about death.

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Bishop Pat. I don’t trust you. I wish I could. Perhaps I’ve been brainwashed by those who have been helping me through stuff recently. You’ve hurt me.
I want help but I don’t know if you’re the person to help me. Can you suggest somebody who could mediate between us?

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David Cooper should be referenced for the world of mental health and those who ‘ work’ in it….the influence of the clergy of yesteryear they now enjoy….and some of them just as dodgy….I mixed in their circles for thirty two years…..

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2.58: Mulvihill, if you spoke in clearer terms instead of this crap, you’d enhance your standing but this shit is nonsense… Think your mind is going around in “circles” for mixing around “them” for 30 years.. What are you really trying to say?

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Beelleen Mulveeheeleen, entirely in his own regard mind you, has always fancied himself as something of “a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma” . 😁

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Mulvihill. Is that buck used to run around Maynooth like Dr Who? Big long coat and long scarves? Fortycoats. Angry wee cub he were too.

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I am fascinated by priests who complain about compulsory celibacy. It’s only compulsory if you choose, freely, to become a priest and choose, freely, to remain a priest.
It’s not as if we have conscription or slavery forcing men to be priests. It is known universally, even among non-Catholics, that Latin rite priests are celibate in 99.999% of cases. Priests had an expensive, lengthy formation lasting at least six years, they were in their mid-20s when they were ordained, and before major orders they signed a public declaration that they were seeking the clerical state, with all its obligations.
Celibacy is not a secret. No bishop took a new priest aside in the sacristy after the ordination and said “sorry, there never seemed to be a right time to mention this, but you have to be celibate. Sorry to be only breaking the bad news now”.

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Well a lot of people in all walks of life want to have their cake and eat it. There are also a lot of nasty pieces of work around who don’t think rules are for them. I would also have thought the clergy would attract some fairly psychopathic people (in search of identity or whatever) who would be bound to ignore the rules.

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3:47
You miss the point. By joining something not intrinsic to orders, namely, celibacy – something not done for the first millennium, you end up with compulsory celibacy. The fact that people who do not have the charism of celibacy for the kingdom experience a call to priesthood may very well be the Holy Spirit’s promptings to have Christians reconsider this coupling. It would be useful to apply the Gamaliel principle to this subject.

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Yes they call her a variety of names, aul doll, aul maid, aul sissy and aul shrew. All appropriate.

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+Pat, I wonder when the ErstwhilePool stuff is going to hit the news? They got collared the CID woman and she was like a wild animal in the interview room until she got out and they were all waiting for her in the custody suite, it was then she realised her game was up. It is my guess she is the reason nobody ever got back to me!

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SOMEONE

I really dont know who you are.
I did not read your father’s obituary.
I have no problem contacting you first.
But I have no way of contacting you.

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5 40: And you are a candidate for someone attempting to look intelligent with your bizarre, cryptic messages!! Cop on – you revealed much nonsense on this blog In the past. Go away…

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In addition to the various addictions attributed to priests, there will also be… well, let’s just say, compulsive self-arousal. Their browser history will be porn porn porn porn porn porn and more gay porn.

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@5.44pm What will your broswer history contain? Probably the same porn that you speak about! It’s often the way with people who highlight these things through experience of life. Don’t protest too much. You are the one clearly with the problem.

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Bishop Pat. Did you manage to write to the Scottish Bishops about the intel you received from me and others? Any acknowledgment or reply?

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SOMEONE

I now know you are. Thank you for that.

I am willing to correct anything I said that was not true and delete etc.

The whole story is very complex with many involved.

If you do not allow me to do these things I cannot do them.

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4.48 The only advice I can give you if speaking to any Clergy or Bishops is to ask them to put on their Purple Stole.
Then it has to be in Secrecy and they could not repeat anything you say.
However if you want them to Advocate for you then they could not wear the Purple Stole.
That is RC teaching and Canon Law but I do not know what Bishop pat’s take on it is.

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