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FATHER JOHN HYDE SJ

John Hyde SJ

Yesterdays topic of miracles and healings reminded me of Fr John Hyde SJ, a regular visitor to my childhood home, a theologian and a man with the gift of healing.

I think Fr Hyde was also my primary inspiration to be a priest.

When he visited my home and had his normal meal of two boiled eggs, wheaten bread and tea, he always passed the top of his two eggs over to me. That was a big deal for a four-year old then

As a child, I instinctively knew I was in the presence of a very holy man.

My granny Kate always put on Fr Hyde’s hat to ward off headaches and she drank whatever tea he left in his cup.

In Milltown in Dublin he taught theology.

He was the the Irish speaking area of Cork and spoke beautiful Irish.

He was famous for hundreds of healings among the people of rural Co. Offaly around areas like Rahan and Pollagh.

Locals claimed have seen him walking in his bare feet on the old gravel roads around Rahan in the early hours of the morning doing penance.

He did have the penetential spirituality of the old Irish monks.

Theologically he was very conservative.

I once asked him: “Fr Hyde, how do you feel about Hans Kung”.

He answered:

“When I hear that name I get a pain in my belly. He’s almost a Protestant”.

When he was dying I asked him if he minded dying.

He answered: “I hate the fuss of it all. I wish they put me in a back room and came and got me when the smell gets too bad”.

I had the privilege of concelebrating Fr Hyde’s Funeral Mass when he died in Gardiner Street, Dublin in 1985.

I believe Father Hyde is an uncanonised saint.

And the Jesuits never truly appreciated him.

As another Jesuit friend used to recite out loud:

“The Jesuits

They join the order without knowing each other.

They live together without loving each other.

And they die together without mourning each other“.

JOHN CHARLES MC QUAID – RULER OF CATHOLIC IRELAND.

96 replies on “FATHER JOHN HYDE SJ”

Well, he may have been holy, but he was nuts, and used to tell kids they would go to hell if they didn’t pray the rosary. A bit OTT in his later years. Wonderful blue eyes, however.

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I couldn’t agree more about Hyde being OTT. He was a head the ball that was a bit too keen on fire and brimstone, he preached fear not mercy or love. If you consider this man to be some kind of Saint then that tells us more about your judgement.

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Look at most of the saints. They were often judged to be mad. Jesus himself was thought to be mad.

I sense an awful lot of cynicism in your comment.

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9.55am

It’s loving, pastoral even, to tell people to repent and believe the Good News. Didn’t Jesus call sinners to repentance?

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@ 9:55,
“a bit too keen on fire and brimstone”
When God’s judgement on sin is neglected, Christ cannot be presented as a Saviour from sin and the wrath of God. If there is silence about these things and a preaching of a Christ who saves only from self and the sorrows of this world, the Christ of the Bible is not being preached. People are, in effect, bearing false witness and preaching a false Christ. The message is then “another gospel.”

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At 10.07, holiness is LOVE, not some clerical bully emotionally abusing kids.

Roman Catholicism historically has always, and wrongly, linked holiness with suffering, not with love. It has made many Catholics hard-hearted, and utterly ruthless.

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At 10.21, nutty is one thing; bigoted is another.
Hyde was a sectarian bigot. A poor example, and an encouragement to hatred and division.
True saints inspire with leadership qualities AWAY from bad social and moral trends. Hyde merely confirmed current trends of virulent anti-Protestantism.
Would Jesus have encouraged such divisions between Jews and Samartans?

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It is not loving and pastoral, 10.17, to coerce people into repentance by filling impressionable children’s heads with stories of hell and damnation; that is emotional child abuse.

Most Catholics never mature beyond this stage of their psychology, even as old adults. They remain emotional five-year-old for their entire lives.

Men like Hyde scarred for life generations of Catholics. No wonder they sought to get the child, so they could make the man: they, like certain communists, were into brainwashing.

Hyde should have been put on trial for child exploitation, not put on a pedestal for sainthood.

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Holy people are able to suffer with others on their journeys. Much scandal is the result of individuals who were unwilling to suffer for the sake of truth and justice. A fundamental element of Christianity is to suffer out of love.

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@4:46: Agree. You describe the indoctrination processes very well. It’s so insidious that those affected do not at all perceive it.

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10:21 am– A bit “nutty” to be a saint? I’ll happily go along with that, guys and dolls lol x

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Jesus must have been a proper nutjob, then.
So what you’re saying is that Christianity and Christians are… bonkers?
And you expect to make converts? 😂

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I am a religious of many years standing, and I have to say that little ditty about the SJs rings bells for me. I’ve got used to it over the years, but in reality we are all little individuals playing at being together and in community. We know when to trot out the communitarian language and the various documents at Chapters talking about our care, concern, love for each other and our mission, but in reality we are a series of individuals doing our own thing and making sure that we have another life outside the community that supports us. I note when one of us dies, there is little sense of loss. Mostly because we don’t really know each other and love each other, even after spending decades together. It’s sad, but it is the reality.

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9:09 am– What you describe sounds like most ordinary family home settings, kind of.
You are there for one a other, aren’t you?
Do you “put up” with each other — even any who can be annoying from time-to-time?
I don’t think we’re expected to do cartwheels over everybody we live with or are even aquinted with.
Do you pray together, like in the chapel? And wanting your own space or time to do your own thing is not at all something to feel guilty over, you know.
Do you guys crack open a bottle of wine when at the meal table together…?
I hope this helps a little, I’m not too good at these things, but I still try to help.
Anyways, lockdown is ending soon and this will be a relief in itself. I think lockdown has taken its toll on most of us.
God bless x

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10.59, are you for real? Most families are not like those Jesuits. What kind of household did you grow up in?

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Pat, I am glad you had this good experience with Fr. Hyde, SJ…I too have been fortunate to have encountered two wonderfully kind, caring, understanding and wise priests, a Franciscan and a Carmelite. Their wisdom in every way and spiritual guudance were of inestimable value to me. There are very many Christ like priests among the presbyterate. Thank God – and may all priests and people be blessed on this great Feast of Pentecost. Blessings on you too Pat.

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3:22 pm — I was tryouts Ng to help the man, give him some kind words of encouragement to help if feeling a bit low…
I hope that clears matters up for You x

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Pat, a comment you made in yesterday’s blog offers a great insight into your distorted thinking. You refer to offering your life to God in place of the little child who was ill. That notion smells of a hostage exchange – the kind of deal you might do with ruthless terrorists – the kind Maximillian Kolbe did with his Nazi persecutors. Your comment betrays a distorted notion of a bloodthirsty God who needed to be appeased in some bizarre way. If you had any kind of relationship with the Lord such thinking would have no place in your mind.

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At times like that people aren’t usually thinking of theological niceties. I disagree with you though, I think Pat’s thinking was firmly in line with a lot of Catholic ideas of reparation, victim souls, etc, usually found in female religious life.

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At 9.23, yes, and such notions are trite nonsense.
Pat isn’t as far removed from the self-flagellating mentality of Mother Theresa as he would have us believe.
Roman Catholicism has for centuries been driven by the sick, pseudo-spiritual notion that God gets off on (is appeased and triggered by) self-inflicted human pain; hence the twisted drivel about ‘victim souls’.
These notions are born of sick minds, like Mother Theresa. They maintain those minds, and they make others.
Jesus came to obey the Father, not to suffer and die on the Cross. The order here is crucial. As usual, Roman Catholics get it wrong.

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I disagree.

The God of absolute generosity responds to generosity.

And as it worked out the clot disappeared 😁

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Thank you for sharing with us the time you healed the baby, you were meant to be in that hospital at that time.
The Lord chose well…
The Lord allowed you to work this miracle, not only for the parents of the child: He did it for you, too, Bishop Pat.
I believe He was telling you something, He was further enriching you and your ministry.
“… This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased…” 😊
Matthew 3:17

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Anon@3:29: So why is your all loving God sitting on his lazy arse ignoring us most of the time? Fat lot of good he is!
Maybe we’re back to the “mysterious ways ” thingy!

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Nonsense. God responds to need out of love.
Have you forgotten what Jesus said about the Father’s desired relationship with each of us?
‘If you who are evil know how to give good things… how much more will your Father in Heaven give good things to those who ask him?’
If there is generositity involved here, it is God’s, not ours.

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At 10.22, if there was miraculous healing of that baby, it was by God, not by Pat Buckley.
Your attribution of healing to Pat is blasphemous. Only God can heal. Jesus made this very clear.

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@9:18: A perceptive comment. Thanks.
To consider the origins of the notion of the bloodthirsty God, may I offer some thoughts as follows.
The notion of appeasing all powerful but unseen “powers” aka gods, is as old as humanity. It goes back to primitive humanity cowering in caves and forests from the terrors of nature’s devastating earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, lightening, floods, etc, none of which were understood. These entirely natural events were ascribed by our primitive ancestors to “gods” and their effects thought to be purposely directed at us. This thinking is a long standing instinctive human self centered tendency to place ourselves as central to all existence.
The “appeasement” of the wrath of these vengeful gods evolved over countless generations. It became the perogative of individuals perceived to have influence in human society, and by extension, with these unseen “gods.” Thus evolved the first “priests”, and consequently their acquisition of primacy in society through their leadership of practices and rituals believed to influence the unseen gods. These thematic processes occurred over many thousands of years worldwide, with wide variation in practices, but with central belief cores associating human dependency and our wellbeing on appeasing “the gods” by sacrificial offerings conducted by priestly intercessors on our behalf.
When moving up the scale from apparently innefective token offerings, human sacrifice: the greatest possible offering, became the most significant and powerful token of appeasement. It became a grim reality as part of the priestly function of many past primitive cultures, for example Aztec and Inca in South America. It continues to find expression even to this day, albeit in less gory circumstances!
Even though we now scientifically understand many formerly perceived “Godly interventions” such as lightening earthquakes etc, the vestiges of former human misinterpretation of natural disasters and our primitive responses live on in many religious practices.
Christian beliefs in the “sacrifice ” of Christ on Calvary and its “continuation” through “ontologically endowed” priestly offerings of the “Mass” can be understood as part of humankinds continuing evolution in the “Western world” and its ” colonies” as influenced by Christianity. Here, the dominant theme of a bloodthirsty vengeful God of the pre-Christian era, now seems to be in the process of further evolving.
Elsewhere evolution continues change in other forms of beliefs and practices .
MMM

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How do expect people to plough through that essay, MMM? You didn’t even bother to break it up into paragraphs.
I scrolled on by.

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12.30: MMM….You should just have given the Wikipedia References!!!! Or Mircea Eliade’s Comparative Religions chapters. This is irrelevant information. Read it all before in the aforementioned sources!!!

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I don’t think he’s too much bothered 12:46. He probably presumes the more intelligent will read it regardless of format and there’s little point with the others who won’t follow it anyway.
It appears to condense broad understandings requiring some thought in following but nevertheless offers food for that. But obviously you’re not sufficiently hungry. Keep scrolling!

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Oh 1:14 I am impressed! You’re obviously intelligent and well read. But have you anything constructive to say, either to agree with or correct the comment. You say it’s irrelevant info, so surely you can better inform us?
I await with breath both bated and baited!
MMM

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Correct at 12.30.
They won’t admit it but Christians today are no farther forward anthropologically than the primitive fears and vulnerability of their pagan ancestors in trying to appease (butter up) a perpetually fickle and angry god. Jesus is simply the modern version of those gods.
We regularly have one poster on this blog who threatens us all that God is ‘ANGRY’.

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@3:37, surely you’re not referring to the Holy Gid?

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9.18
It’s the kind of ‘deal’Jesus did, with himself, not because he was at a loose end, but because there was no othe way.

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I don’t think he “hated” Protestants. Like all of his time, he saw Protestantism as heresy.

Even saints are affected by prevailing beliefs and cultures.

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What is heresy except another way of looking at something? That’s a virtue to a post-modern sensibility.

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The thing is, Protestants are heretics. There’s no point in being mealy-mouthed about it or beating around the bush.

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10.09, saints are supposed to be affected by the Gospel, not by prevailing, bigoted mores. You’re making excuses for Hyde that you wouldn’t make for a lay person.
I’d bet not one priest posting here would make the same excuses for Dr Ian Paisley because he would have regarded Roman Catholicism as heresy.

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Very nice story +Pat. Very encouraging and uplifting. There have been some wonderful Jesuits. Like John Sullivan. Some not so wonderful like Paul Prior and the selection committee of three who nominated him to the novitate in Birmingham.

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Taking of Birmingham, we have the SJs at Oscott these days camping out while there place is being majorly rebuilt. They evidently are confident about the future to be putting so much money in to a residence and house for their students. I guess you would have to really want to be a Jesuit to spend a couple of years in Birmingham, whereas some other orders could send you to much more salubrious places ! Birmingham is hugely underwhelming – which is a polite way of saying its a dump. Oh, well, I’m afraid I’m stuck here for a few more years, unless I can persuade the Bishop to let me go to the VEC.

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According to their Charity Commission accounts, the British Province of the SJs have assets of £800 million.

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Why can’t the Jesuits stay permanently in a wing in Oscott or move to some of the empty space in Maynooth and give to the poor the £6m that would save?

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@9:27 I am sorry you feel normal life is below you. I don’t know what you think your doing training as a priest. I am starting a novena for you to be rejected or sent to a parish you hate.

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The nSJs have all their needs met and have no bills to pay. During their far too long training they have a life of ease in top universities in agreeable cities all round the world.

Lots of people on Universal Credit or in low paid jobs don’t have £10 left over every week.

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At 11.15, and all priests promise or vow celibacy.😅 But sure, who’s checking?

Words, as we are learning quickly these days, are cheap as chips. But good deeds by priests are rare as hens’ teeth.

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May our hearts and minds be open to receive the Spirit’s gifts.
I wish all of you and your loved ones every blessing on this Pentecost feast of unity and of understanding!
PAX

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Does it not sadden you to think that Fr John SJ would be so disappointed in what you became? This saintly man would have opposed and rejected all you stand for.

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I have thought about that in the context of Fr John and Archbishop McQuaid.

They are now enjoying the Beatific Vision and are infinitely wiser now than they were on earth.

I think they are more “concerned” anout the total corruption of the RCC than they are about me.

In fact I believe they are interceding for me.

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I think that’s a very consistent answer, Pat. Thank you for answering me. I don’t exactly agree with you but I understand your position.

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So you are, in your own view, already in possession of this wisdom they now have while you are still on earth? They realise in Heaven that Pat Buckley is right? You are quite incredible. The “total corruption” of the Church? Really? Absolute nonsense. There has always been corruption from the get go. To speak of “total corruption” is simply your own jaundiced spin. Christ will deal with the corruption and the corrupters as He will deal with you and your delusions.

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9.58
Sadly it is the dioceses that is low on money and savings however in some cases they will be very low over next five years.
Even with all the property some dioceses have it will not save them so amalgamations will have to happen in parishes and dioceses and that was pre Covid so it will be worst post Covid.
The Religious communities are very clever with investments and income and they see the problem in the parishes that they may administer in but most are handing back the parishes and saying lack of clergy but the lack of income can be very low and the returns to the diocesan funds by percentage.

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How does one province of one order end up with hundreds of millions of £s in investments?

Panorama should do an investigation of all the religious orders. It must be billions in total.

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Yes, the SJs do have considerable reserves, but they do a great deal with it, including their Jesuit Refugee Service which does great work here and abroad. They fund that in considerable part, so they don’t just keep the money and enjoy themselves ! As to the SJs in training, I think the SJs do have a much more realistic and sensible approach to the training of their students, creative, flexible, sane and with a broader horizon than you find in the usual seminary setting. I think the SJs priests of the future will be a more integrated and stable bunch than the lot that are being turned out by Oscott, Allen Hall and the English College Rome.

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@1253 – they use the investments and income to educate the already rich and posh. Who else is going to help that needy constituency ?!

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@12:53 I would expect somebody like you to understand but one can do a lot more with £75million whilst it’s in the bank earning interest than you can just giving it to the poor.
The Jesuits are smart, they know how to serve others effectively with the money.

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@5:22

It’s far more than £75m we are talking about. That’s for the waifs and orphans of Stoneyhurst.

The main SJ accounts show that they have £539 million in investments (separate from all the property and other assets). That’s wild.

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3.41: And Christ will also deal with haters, liars, racists and bigots like you. Your ilk are not beyond judgment!! Fool….

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There’s a movie on Netflix called Clergy. Those who have Netflix should watch it. It is about the psychological and spiritual deep dysfunctionality of Catholic priests, and the Catholic Church, in Poland. A brilliant piece of cinematography.

There is now nowhere to hide for this church, and it’s priests, if even the last Roman Catholic bastion in Europe, Poland, is being put under the spotlight by its own people.

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May you all get Fruits of the Spirit on this Pentecost Sundayhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3iB30gCqAc

Think and say a Prayer for all the Children who cannot get their Confirmation since the start of the pandemic in Killaloe Dioceses alone 2000 children waiting.

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2.58: MMM – we get very bored with repeat, repeat, repeat narratives, as you are prone to do..Repeat. 😁😃😂😁…We can read extensive encyclopaedic chapters ourselves.

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Nice one @ 7:09. Indeed some concepts require a bit of thinking, and can’t be easily simplified, …..for the simple.
MMM

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6 01. Are you another who presumes what YOU don’t like applies to everybody? We, we, we we!. Easily bored? I suppose simple minds just prefer simplistic brief items to make few demands on limited neurons?

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7.10: Sir/ Madam: I believe I speak for the vast majority – we don’t need repeat, repeat essays from anyone on the blog. If you read this blog, you’ll notice that many, like myself, get tired of “repeaters”, beating the same drum. MMM can be quite incisive at times but we get a continuum of “the same” a little too often. Much of the counter view points have been aired frequently. Saying that, I prefer MMM’s commentary to that of MC – the maestro of nastyism. Now, are you happy? 😎😎..

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No@7:54, I don’t think 7.10 will be “happy” at all, for you have simply continued to assume YOU speak for many.
As said in earlier comment: more “we, we, we, we!”
There at least is consistency in MMM’S comments and explanations for his views and “putting it up” to cathbotlike commentators to provide the proofs he requests for their beliefs. Your comment typically follows the familiar ad hominem denigrating pattern, avoids the issues, and does you little credit.

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“Much of the counter viewpoints have been aired frequently” you say @ 7.54.
Yes, but only in the form of cathbots again and again proclaiming their beliefs, or faith, but never offering any objective proof or evidence as the basis for those beliefs. (If one discounts that much disputed biblical rigmarole!)

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Anon. at 6.10: I agree with 6.01: much of the comments from MMM have been aired very often.. Nothing wrong with saying that. It’s a legitimate opinion. As for simple minds: somehow this inane comment from you suggests a pin of a needle size neuron in your brain – or less!! Rather innocuous!

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The archdiocese of Halifax-Yarmouth has merged 65 parishes into 19. With clusters of church buildings, but 2 or 3 priests living together in one parish house, so that they are not isolated.
Westminster Diocese has 212 parishes, independent within their deaneries. Elsie has no plans to merge them. Her successor will have to face the need the rationalise the current structure, with so many churches/parishes in close proximity. For example, two Kensington parishes down the road from each other, and many more close by.
With many priests due to retire within the next 5 to 10 years, the current set-up will not work. The new archbishop will have to make bold changes to stabilise the future of the diocese. Perhaps a radical restructuring programme is the answer, selling off many surplus buildings. Westminster should follow the example of Halifax-Yarmouth and Nottingham. Fewer, larger parishes is the answer.

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Why are we selling off buildings and merging parishes? Vatican II ushered in a New Springtime. Didn’t it?

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I was quite intrigued by the info about Fr. Hyde’s command of Irish. My sister dug up a census record that Irish was our great grandparents’ native tongue but English was my grandmother’s. Which got me to thinking about how quickly a language can disappear. Two or three generations it’s gone.
So nice to read that Father spoke beautiful Irish and shared the tops of his two eggs with Bishop Patrick which my father did with me so long ago.

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