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FATHER’S DAY – MY DAD.

Unsurprisingly, Father’s Day on Sunday made me think of my dad Jim.

As a big smoker, he died at the all too early age of 60 in January 1985. So I have not seen him for 36 years.

Jim was born in 1924 in a place called Pollagh, outside Tullamore, Co. Offaly.

Due to family poverty, he was forced to leave school aged 12, to go minding cattle and bring home a very small weekly wage of £2.6d – £ 5.93 today.

He was a bright lad and deepy regretted not getting a better education.

At 18, in 1942, he got a job as a factory worker in Salt’s spinning mill in Tullamore and quickly became a supervisor.

Salts spinning mill – former Tullamore jail

While at Salt’s he got involved in the trade union movement and became the union rep there.

In 1956 a vacancy for a full-time trade union branch secretary in Carlow. Jim applied and got the job and we all moved to Carlow.

In 1960 he was moved to the IT&GWU (Irish Transport and General Workers Union) at Liberty Hall in Dublin and we all moved to Dublin.

He became branch secretary of Branch 13.

During his union time he studied at home and got his A levels.

He then took evening classes at University College Dublin and gained a BA in philosophy, archaeology and economics in 1972.

Then he studied at the Kings Inns in Dublin and was called to the bar in 1978.

During this time he had left the union and had become the personnel manager for Avon cosmetics at Portarlington in Co. Laoise. Avon sponsored his studies for the bar.

So the 12-year-old cattle minder was now James Buckley BA BL.

During all this time he fathered 17 children – 11 of whom lived to adulthood. For much of the time he had two jobs to support the family.

I was the firstborn.

Jim was a very strong anti-establishment  socialist and from the age of 3 I was brought to union meetings and picket lines.

So, its hardly surprising that I have turned out to be anti-establishment and a rebel.

Jim became a big smoker as a result of attending union meetings where cigarettes were passed around like biscuits.

He died during his 9 th heart attack while the doctors worked on him in resuss. I anointed him while the doctors worked on him. The doctors, presuming me to be the hospital chaplain, said to me: “Im afraid he’s done for Father”.

I celebrated his funeral at our parish church at Ballygall in Dublin.

It was the second hardest thing I’ve done.

The hardest was celebrating my mother’s funeral 21 years later in 2006.

86 replies on “FATHER’S DAY – MY DAD.”

Thank you for sharing with us, Bishop Pat. Losing close relatives, like mums, dads and nanners is painful. Sure, with time it things become much easier, but when they’ve been such a big part of our lives it’s not the easiest thing.
Your dad did very well for both himself and your family, he is testament to people being able to achieve great goals, all the while while supporting his family and doing his bit for the community and wider society.
Your late father sounds very much like one of the proper unionists, an old school—for others, and not for themselves.
I reckon I’d like it on the picket line, I can tell you. No nonsense. No political correctness. No shit.
______________________
My younger cousins’ dad took his own life last August, as you already know, Bishop Pat. He was only 47. Still can’t believe it, and because of what I was forced to ensure because of the “other lot” I was unable to fully be there and put my energies into helping to hold them up. Although I still did my part and kept checked in with them, still do.
We lost the baby when she was three-years-old back in 2008. The kids’ dad, my uncle, was never able to fully get over the baby’s death and I think this more than likely contributed to him leaving us at such a young age.
——-
Those who abused, assisted, enabled and concealed, have done so much damage.
These people should be in prisons for dangerous psychopaths.
Everything about them is dangerous and lethal; the culture is silence is a breeding ground for abusers, such wickedness and evilness.
Thank the Lord IICSA are taking very serious actions to help make kids and vulnerable people a lot more safer — it simply cannot go on.
And it most certainly will NOT go on in my back garden while I’m on watch, people. You’d better believe it, baby! 😉 x

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Some people realise their potential later in life and occasionally against the odds. Mr and Mrs Buckley R.I.P.

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Prayers for your father’s peaceful rest +Pat. In a relatively short life he had remarkable achievements. So many capable people of the not too distant past, my own parents included, were brought up in a context where eduction was a luxury and such opportunities did not exist. My generation takes it for granted not always appreciating how blessed we are and perhaps not always displaying the maturity and work ethic of pervious generations.

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Oh indeed Pat,a man of big achievements and I’m sure would be very proud of your compassion and mission for years now in helping others. No mean achievement.
Indeed 60 is so young. Very unfortunate.
My own father went very early also at 63 from cancer. Also came from extremely humble beginnings and was driven to help others all his life.
Nice to remember them and of course we never forget .
At least we can be sure they are free of all stress and pain in the next life.

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Pat, a lovely remembrance of your father. And your mother holds an equally precious place in your heart too. Despite the horrendous personalised attacks on priests on your blog with a general view that we deserve only contempt, there is a particular sadness for a priest when both parents die. (Pat knows). It’s the ending of a special bond, a connection and changes the dynamics if you belong to a big family. Having officiated at both my parent’s funerals and a sibling – all at youngish ages – it is a most painful experience. There is the expectation – as with men in general – that you should just “get on with life and work”. A big mistake for men…we need to grieve: we need support: we need understanding: we must find support groups for our grieving, apart from counselling (if required). Having to officiate at family and relatives funerals is very difficult…God bless your parents.

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11.31

‘There is a particular sadness foe priests when both parents die’?

No, There isn’t; no more so than for anyone else.

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10.40: Magna: since you are not a priest – being prevented proceeding as a student – you have no idea of the truth of my statement. Grief is very different for each person who grieves. It casts a huge shadow over our lives. Many priests have an attachment to their parents, in my case to my mother as my father died young: therefore for many years I felt an obligation to her and she was the one around whom we all gathered. All my family were married, so after her death, I found myself very much alone. Our home eventually was sold. This was an ending of an era as I would have gone home every Sunday and stayed over while my mother was there. I know many priests in similar situations. We all react differently to loss, but all priests who have lost both parents feel their absence in a particular way precisely because of the loyalty, attachment, care, love and affection which parents, a mother especially, have for their “priest son”. Having experienced much loss and grief over the years within my famy, among relatives and friends, I appreciate the depth of grief which parishioners experience. Yes, my grief is no greater than anyone else, but for me it is “particular”, as outlined above!

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Apologies if I’ve already sent this Pat.
2:10 What you don’t realize, since you are a priest, is that the reason many celibates have such a particular attachment to their parents is that they have never done the work of psycho-sexual individuation which takes place through your twenties. The church keeps them at the going to university stage. Consider the MIA priest mentioned here who went ‘home’ to his parents.

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2.10
First, priest, I was not prevented from proceeding to ordination; I left seminary of my own accord. You are a liar, like the majority of your colleagues who post here and make that statement about me.
You ought to be ashamed of yourself for that lie, because you do know that you are lying; but lying seems to be the modus operandi of romanist priests, so it is to be expected of them. But it will not go unremarked when you die. Liars have an obligation, through repentance, to restore truth in restitution.
I suppose it shouldn’t have surprised me either that you would think grief over deceased parents greater for priests than for lay people. Let’s be honest here, you parasites think yourselves exceptional in just about every other area of your lives ; it was why priests who raped or sodomised little children were protected and enabled by other priests, like you, because you thought yourselves entitled to different treatment from anyone else in these circumstances, certainly better treatment than you thought those highly unexceptional children deserved.
Your grief, priest, over the loss of your relatives is no different from that of anyone else, despite what you tell yourself. You’re a fool even to think it so.
Get over yourself.

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Secondary education in the Republic of Ireland was not free until 1967 (lagging well behind Northern Ireland) and therefore beyond the reach of most people there. In part, it is what happens when clerics and religious of the Roman Catholic Church control such a vital social service : they expect to be handsomely paid, hence the exorbitant fees that were charged.

Secondary and tertiary education in that part of Ireland was effectively privatised to the Roman Catholic Church.

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@2:10: “….a mother has for her priest son…” ‘cos they’re “special”!

Once a mummy’s boy; always a mummy’s boy.
Wise up gombeen!

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6.30

There is no dignity, Shammy boy, in lying. That is what the romanist priest at 2.10 did about me.

Inability to acknowledge lying and liars seems to be one of your limitations.

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I’m sorry for your loss Bishop Pat. I silently blessed myself when I read your story this morning.
Fr. Anon 11:31, I’m sorry for your loss. At 2:10 you were very dignified in offering a further explanation for those with limitations.
Divínum auxílium máneat semper nobíscum.
Fidélium ánimæ per misericórdiam Dei requiescant in pace.
🙏

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A man abused for years by a paedophile priest at a County Down school is to receive a six-figure sum in damages, the High Court has been told.
Tony Gribben, 61, sued the trustees and board of governors at St Colman’s College in Newry and the Diocese of Dromore.
He took the lawsuit over the sexual and physical assaults suffered at the hands of the late Father Malachy Finnegan.
The pay-out to Mr Gribben forms part of a settlement.
A personal apology will also be issued on behalf of the leader of the Catholic Church in Ireland under the terms of the agreement.
Outside the court, Mr Gribben said that for the apology to be meaningful, the Church must “acknowledge it was more concerned about protecting its reputation than safeguarding children from the actions of predatory paedophiles like Finnegan”.
“The diocese needs to be completely transparent in cooperating with a long overdue investigation on its failings.”
Mr Gribben claimed for negligence and failures to protect him from Finnegan’s alleged “industrial-scale abuse” while he was a pupil at the school from 1970 to 1977.
In court on Monday his barrister announced that a resolution has been reached in the action.
“The defendants (will) pay the plaintiff’s solicitors a six-figure sum within a defined period,” she said.
She also disclosed that the diocese is to provide her client with a personal, written apology from Archbishop Eamon Martin within three weeks.
The letter will “recognise the pain, suffering, hurt and distress” Mr Gribben experienced during his time at St Colman’s, as well as the subsequent affect on him.
He is then to meet the archbishop and the safeguarding director for the diocese to discuss his experiences.
Finnegan taught and worked at St Colman’s College from 1967 to 1987, spending the last decade as the school’s president.
He went on to serve as a parish priest in Clonduff, County Down.
The priest, who died in 2002, was accused of a long campaign of child sexual abuse, but was never prosecuted or questioned by police about claims made against him.
In 2018 it emerged that the Diocese of Dromore had settled a claim made by one of his victims.
At that stage the board of governors at St Colman’s condemned the physical, sexual and emotional abuse inflicted by Finnegan while working there.
The priest’s image was also removed from the school’s photographs.
At the time the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) set up a team of detectives to investigate Finnegan’s activities.
Nine people were said to have been interviewed under caution, but no direction was made to prosecute anyone.

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I imagine his lawyers did it no foal no fee. And these cases are usually very strong.

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Oh no: it does!
It worries about the cost, ….and may have to ask the Dromore diocese cathbots to dip into their wallets to pay for this!
I had brothers and cousins went to Colmans which we called Violet Hill. I was told, much later in life of one distant relation who received a “settlement ” for abuse, on conditions of non disclosure. At that time, over 20 years ago, none of us had any idea of the scale of abuse.
MMM

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MMM, it is ALWAYS the cathbots who pay for the sins of ‘Father’ in the end.

Serves them right for being so sheepish. 😀

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9.31am anon

Who was that Bishop at that time? Daly supporter of black and tans?

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Dioceses have litigation insurance. One of the reasons they’re so defensive about abuse is it’s driven by insurance and lawyers.
You may say that this is a disgrace for the church of God to behave like any grabbing corporation and you’d be spot on.
The problem with suing is in law the money is supposed to ‘compensate’ you but they will make you sign a non-disclosure agreement to try to preserve their reputation. Bastards.
That is why I like Bishop Pat’s approach of publishing but being in a position where there is literally no point suing him because his assets amount to a car.
I had an awful employer some years ago who were dangerous and where bullying was rife. When I walked out I would have had a good case for constructive dismissal but didn’t want to be forced to keep it quiet and didn’t want money. So I left a totally shitty but very factual review for them all over the place on the internet. After I did that others were emboldened to do the same and in two months their reviews all became absolutely terrible. They got what I wanted and they wouldn’t sue me because I still have the box of evidence in my wardrobe.

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Be careful Pat, they would try to take your breviary given half a chance 😂

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5.28: Magna, you are to be pitied. Truly to be pitied. Thank God I had great relationships with my parents and family that something as painful an experience of deaths in my family effected wonderful, human, empathetic changes in my life. Your harshness and lack of any kind of empathy has its foundations in your bad, negative seminary experience and subsequent experiences as you shared recently, for which you received admiration for your admission, even from me, one of your fiercest critics. There is something very refreshing when any individual admits to their truth and responds accordingly. You gave the impression that you were turning a new leaf. Sadly, not so. Your unkindness, your scorn, mockery and hatred for priests is a moral wound and deficit in your life. Your complete lack of any emotion on the pain of loss and grief is shameful. You only further damage yourself. Magna, I am fortunate to be surrounded by good colleagues, family, friends and parishioners who truly care and ensure that I am given necessary support. That’s the difference between us – the absence of such people in your life and the wonderful presence of loving people in my life. And, when you discover how to truly be empathetic, you will be a better human being. All losses and griefs are huge events in our lives, but I find my many losses and griefs to be very particular to me because of deep loving bonds. Just a normal human being….

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9.29
I did not ignore your grief; I pointed out your self-aggrandising sense of exceptionalism about it.
Four-and-a-half years ago, my beloved mother died. I resent, deeply, anyone, priest or other, implying that his grief was/is deeper than mine. How the hell would you know?! This is what you suggested with the word ‘particular’, whether or not you have the balls to acknowledge the fact.
As for unkindness on my part, I find it exceptional to be kind to a man who elevates his parental grief over mine, just because he is a priest, and who, along with his colleagues, repeats the defamatory lie, unapologetically so far, that I was prevented from ordination.
I’ll make you a deal, priests: change your behaviour, and I’ll change mine.

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At 12.15, I hope more victims of Finnegan now find the courage and confidence to come forward and institute similar legal proceedings.

Until these organisations are made to suffer financially and severely, children’s rights will never be given priority by them.

Well done, Tony Gribben.

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And on further thought to my comment above:
If the RCC and school authorities were aware and made a settlement way back then, surely they were negligently culpable in not preventing further abuse by Finnegan which seem to have happened afterwards?
MMM

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At 5.57, I assume that was one aspect of Gribben’s case.

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Aye indeed@ 3:17: But some are so stupid and blind to realities that repetition is necessary before awareness sinks in to dulled consciousness, and consciences.

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4.58: There are a lot of innuendos of a sort in your comment. Having studied psychol8gy and counselling, I assure you I had a perfectly healthy relationship with my parent’s and after my father’s death, I felt it my obligation to be of assistance to my mother. All natural and normal. Since “home” was precisely where our parents lived and the reason we visited “home”, surely it is understandable that when our parents die, there is a great loss. Nothing to do with the incomplete work of “psycho sexual individuation” as you put it! Unless you have a heart of stone and are a detached emotional person, grief does break you apart and effects changing perspectives about our lives. I suspect you are the proverbial cynic and detached from your emotions!!!

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No innuendos. They are in your mind. Incidentally I expected my comment to pass straight over your head because of the way you already spoke.
It was for the edification of the grown ups here.
Oh, since you like innuendos here’s one for you: studied psychology, my arse.

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THE UNIONS AND SOCIALISM…
I’ve always been more of a Labour man — although I don’t vote, and this for a number of good and healthy reasons, the Census being just one… However, I’ll leave that right there haha.
Nowadays the unions have got no welly or clout! Wet fish! Years ago, up untill the 1980s, they were worth their punch. They wouldn’t take any shit. Not now! Not worth a “Tommy Tank” now, the lot of them!
Lots of corrupt and self serving little creepy Crawlies, crawling from underneath one rock and slithering under another!
I, too, am very much an anti-establishment man; why on earth would one choose to cooperate with insidious malevolent individuals?
I may not be the sharpest tool in the box, but I was brought up to respect the rights and dignity of my fellow man and woman. Therefore, I do not trust corrupt Chief Cuntstables, corrupt District Judges, corrupt Civil Court staff, corrupt registered Social Workers, corrupt and filthy lowlife Anglican Bishops, who hold great authority by way of their “allegiance to establishment power” and, who encourages their vicars to abuse vulnerable victims while consistently shielding them from all consequences…
The same goes for Roman Bishops, who like to get a “high” on the the backs of Anglican Bishops’ abuse of establishment “power” and “rights”.
They make my skin fucking crawl, the lot of them. Selfish, filthy and obnoxious.
Speaking of obnoxious…
… There is nothing more worse, more obnoxious, than a Roman Bishop who punches far to high above his own abilities. What a fucking silly clown!
Even more so when they are disastrously incompitent in nature. A clamouring buffoon!
I’m glad I’ve got that out!
PS please feel free to remove anything which could be wrongly perceived an impertinence 😂 x

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Given that the entire trend of the comments about you is that you are a brat and think you are special, I would have thought you would make an effort not to assert your superiority.
Not very bright.

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Your father had nine heart attacks? Christ! That’s terrible. Shows what a tough nut he was.

How long did he practise as a barrister?

He must have made good money.

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He only practised for a short time.

His union salary was average but the job came with a car.

He was very well paid as a personnel manager for an American company.

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So some people think Jerry Carey got of badly for his solo act.
Scotland fined Civil engineer James Lewis-Booth, 37, was seen performing a solo sex act on himself while his trousers were down in Upper Craigs, Stirling £1500.

But got off light by not being placed on Sex offenders register as it was in a private car.

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@ 10:17 You were right.
This means he didn’t even last a full year as a priest.

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Secondary education in the Republic of Ireland was not free until 1967 (lagging well behind Northern Ireland) and therefore beyond the reach of most people there. In part, it is what happens when clerics and religious of the Roman Catholic Church control such a vital social service : they expect to be handsomely paid, hence the exorbitant fees that were charged.

Secondary and tertiary education in that part of Ireland was effectively privatised to the Roman Catholic Church.

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In 1964 I could not have gone to secondary school if I had not won a scholarship by exam from Dublin City Council.

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An American Catholic friend sent me the news from NYT that Carl Nassid, NFL player has come out as gay. Now, this shouldn’t necessarily be cause for comment, save that it contrasts with the poisonous protest from Archbishop Paul Gallagher against Italian legislation to protect people from violence on account of, for example, their gender, sexuality, disability or other “difference”.
As I doubt that Gallagher actually believes any of his own bullshit, it means that he is just another Vatican apparatchik with his eye on a red hat. Vin Nichols pulled a similar stunt a few years back.
As the NYT link may not be generally available, I attach the following link. Make up your own minds about where human decency, honesty and integrity might be located:https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2021/jun/22/carl-nassib-nfl-comes-out-as-gay-players-reaction-jj-watt-julian-edelman

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You are not quite correct about Archbishop Gallagher. The issue is about LGBT ramming their opinion down peoples throats. They are denying people the right to choose how their children are educated. Children do not need to got to faith schools. That is a parental choice. In such matters the school is the extension of the home. Parents must have a say in how THEIR children are educated. If you do not like faith schools dont go.
Nobody should be abused verbally or physically. Too much is said about sexuality. The issue should be about promiscuity and adultery.
Ashers bakery is a very good example of stonewall crossing the line. LGBT think they have all the rights and choices and nobody else has. Hence the woke society we live in today.
Take a look at todays daily mail on line about Italy and the Vatican.

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8.40

Interesting that you should express yourself with such ‘cultural warrior’ aggression on the LGBT: ‘ramming their opinion down people’s throats’ in terms of what is taught in faith schools. Most people would think that the LGBT just wanted a say, given their history of persecution, and epressed influence, but you appear to want to deny them even a soto voice. Which is odd when you think about it, because these schools, if Roman Catholic, would speak portentously of respecting the innate dignity and worth of EVERY student. Perhaps (if you are Roman Catholic) you skipped that bit in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, if you bothered to read it at all.

Parents do have a right to be consulted on how their children are to be educated…but they have no right, not even under the Catechism, to insist their children be educated in bigotry and intolerance of minorities.

As for the Asher case, one tribunal did find against them. Not the clear-cut victory I’m sure they had hoped for.

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‘The issue is about LGBT ramming their opinion down peoples throats.’
Sounds like you’re the one who could do with studying Freud. 😜

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Accept public funds to subsidise RC schools then you must expect secular influence. Why should a LGBT taxpayer with no children pay taxes to support a faith school which instructs its pupils that LGBT people are fundamentally disordered? Children can be instructed in their faith on Saturday mornings at catechism classes in their parishes.

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8:15 and 9:03 sensible and moderate replies to the bigot. The other 9:03 also has a point though.

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I heard on the radio (Radio 4 BBC) this morning a programme about hands. A big chunk of it was about consecrated and anointed hands, of a priest. There was a rather piously self-important Welsh sounding priest talking in the usual clergy speak about being set apart, being special, his hands being for God’s work……all that usual self-serving shite that clergy have used for hundreds of years to put themselves aside, apart and above everybody else. They use this specialness in order to excuse all sorts of things, including their abuses and crimes – so special is how they think of themselves, that they are somewhat surprised and shocked in this day and age when they are suddenly called to account. There’s a psychological mindset amongst clergy about how special they are, and all this anointing business is part of that. I had hoped that they would have got away from that, but my understanding is that in seminaries these days would be priests are still encouraged to think of themselves as so very special, and set apart. I see it in young clergy, so full of themselves and their importance, which you see in the way they talk, the way the act, the way they dress, the way they celebrate Mass etc. The priesthood is a vehicle for them being able to show themselves off. They really are up their own arses. For many of them, they are shocked when they suddenly find out that we, their parishioners, don’t appreciate all that stuff anymore, and we are now not afraid to challenge them and to call them to account. For some, it is too much, and they go MIA or wander off in to some arcane bit of the Church and do canon law or liturgy or whatever, anything so long as they don’t have to handle the faithful too much. The whole theology and thinking about priesthood needs to be reassessed. Otherwise, we will continue having a load of self-agrandissing nancy boys as our priests, who play one way in public, but often have a secret, hidden and parallel life – and for most of them that means a gay life. For whom the priesthood is something to bolster their own life and character. Just a point of view !

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An excellent post. Insightful and sensible.

I know that romanist priests do not want to hear this, and that they go on the defensive when they do, but Jesus himself did not institute priesthood.

If we must talk in these terms, then Jesus intended that we ALL be priests, men AND women, breaking bread, and drinking wine from a communal cup, in egalitarian fellowship. No elitism. No exceptionalism. No privilege. No particularity. No special case. No pass, for ANYONE, guilty of harming the little ones Jesus so severely warned against hurting and misguiding.

The historical record of moral infamy by romanist priests, known especially in the 20th and 21st centuries, makes a nonsense of any argument in favour of patriarchal and institutional priesthood.

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Magna have you read into modern neo-pagan traditions at all? The relevance here is that while some traditions have a distinct priesthood others don’t, in fact some were designed specifically before the internet to be followed by people who would have no contact with the community at all. The result is great, it’s like herding cats. Terry Pratchett’s witches books give a very clear impression he’d read the tradition up carefully although he denied being involved.

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There were many disciples. From them were called the twelve apostles. All disciples answer a call from Christ. The twelve answered a second call from Christ. They were formed into a college.
Jesus sent out seventy(-two) disciples on a mission. The presbyters assisted the apostles, later known as priests who would be co-workers with their bishops.

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Seamus you’ve obviously thought about your comment carefully and decided in response to the many calls to do so the other day, you should further admit that you think bishops are special and the laity are shit on your shoe.

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Seamus @7.47
Your potted account of the origins of Christian ministerial orders is woefully inaccurate and is actually unhistorical.

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6.47
It’s like herding cats? Without a ‘distinct priesthood’? Well, consider the effects of romanist priesthood historically: has it tended to herd, or to scatter? Is the Great Schism evidence of herding? Or the Protestant Reformation? Or the more recent exposure of sexual abuse and its concealment by romanist priests? These are just some of the milestones on the road of historical Romanism pointing to the divisive influence of that priesthood; and there are other, if less significant ones, along the way.
It was not a caste of romanist priests that was the bind holding together the Roman Catholic Church down the centuries; it was the gross abuse of power brought by clerical elitism, principally the inculcation in people that priests and priesthood were essential for salvation (‘extra ecclesiam nulla salus.’: outside the Church there is no salvation.) in direct denial of Hebrews. This was entirely credible to a relatively uneducated, and compliant, laity, because it was priests who traditionally administered the sacraments and, therefore, grace itself; in effect, they administered God. He was answerable to priests alone, and jumped to their commands. Not long ago, I actually heard one Passionist priest say as much at Mass.
There is little unifying in the history of romanist priesthood.

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Yes. It’s a pity Scott Cunningham never wrote a book called ‘Christianity: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner’. It could have revolutionised things with chapters on how not to hoard money, dominate nations and cover up child abuse.

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Lol yes. Although it’s the herding cats aspect that I like and that the church would find repulsive. In a group where everyone is clergy and there is no overarching authority you actually have to manage to get on with people.

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9.00
On point.
That would prioritise such things (rather than dogmatism and dogma) as love, kindness, mercy, tolerance, forgiveness, forebearance etc, the things Jesus made the signature of any genuine disciple of his.

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5.28: O poison one, Magna, the TRUTH hurts you very deeply. Yes, indeed but you are so self obsessed and full of hatred that you cannitallow the reality of Gid’s l8ve a place in your thoughts. You are devoid if true humanity. And, of course we know – you were summarily dismissed from the seminary, try as you may to phrase the reality in your delusional words . Get over the hurt. It weighs you down and has turned you into a miserably unhappy kid! Grow up.

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10.13
Goodness! You typed and posted that comment in an angry hurry, ‘Father’.
It all came out in a confused tumble, didn’t it? Your haste to have a go at me?😅
It must grate on your nerves at least, if not on your conscience, that God did not institute the corrupt priesthood of which you are culpably a part.

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Magna you know full well they habitually lie about everything including that.
Common decency would indicate that you accept an unknown stranger’s account of how they left seminary.

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10.41: Just like you Magna, posted in an angst rage, which seems to be the sole motivation behind much of your narratives. Dearie, the one most angry is YOU….At least I rest assured each night that I’ve tried to be of service to God’s people. Magna, the truth spoken about you hurts you. Doesn’t it? Yeah, big time🤣😂😃😣😣😣😣😥😥…God will of course will forgive you..

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Do you mean the way two of them can’t keep their hands off each other and the third is embarrassed?

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A big spat between Italiam govt and the Vatican especially Paul gallagher ON LGBT. Given that vatican clergy is around approx 80% gay. That figure comes from Martel book.
Anyway why did the Vatican get angst and worried over anti hate laws on lbqt, disability.
Funny enough they didn’t get worried on other countries anti hate laws except for their nearest country.
Extract of an article is here:
“It’s the first time the church has done something like this,” said Robert Mickens, the Rome-based editor of the English-language edition of Catholic daily newspaper La Croix. “They’re worrying about being fined for hate speech.”

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I very much hope that they will be fined for hate speech. DG, especially Joe Ratzinger for the inflammatory language that seemed to justify violence against the LGBT (that this community shouldn’t be ‘surprised’ at it) in their campaign for equality with heterosexuals.

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